#1
Hi!

I just started playing guitar, and I understand a lot just from looking around here on the site, but I have 2 questions about playing chords.

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QUESTION 1

e --- | --- | --- | --- | --- |
B -x- | --- | --- | --- | --- |
G --- | --- | --- | --- | --- |
D --- | -x- | --- | --- | --- |
A --- | --- | -x- | --- | --- |
E --- | --- | -o- | --- | --- |

I understand that that is a C chord...but can someone explain why there is an 'o' on the E string? What does it mean? What is the difference between that and the 'x's?

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QUESTION 2

e --- | -x- | --- | --- | --- |
B --- | --- | -x- | --- | --- |
G --- | --- | --- | -x- | --- |
D --- | --- | --- | -x- | --- |
A --- | -x- | --- | --- | --- |
E --- | -o- | --- | --- | --- |

I know that is a Bm chord. But how is that supposed to be played?! If 'x' means a finger is on a string in that fret, then...damn! I only have 5 fingers, and the thumb is almost impossible to use to play on a big acoustic guitar neck!

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If anyone can answer those questions, I will love them forever.

THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!!!
#2
you can play it, cause the note is in the chord, but its not the typical bass note. The typical bass not is the name of the chord like a c. but if you play the "o" your playing a g as the bass not, which technically makes it a C/G

EDIT: i forgot your second question

its a bar chord. your index holds down all the strings on the 2 fret, then use your other fingers for the other notes
#3
The "o" means don't play that note. =)
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#4
the 0 in the C chord means not to play that note ( on your low E string)

on the Bm you need to barre it with your index finger. i wondered the same thing when i first started playing
#5
o = don't play that string
on a B chord (and many chords like it, called barre chords) you bar the first fret with your first finger and put your other three on the appropriate frets.
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#6
For question 1 it is somewhat optional to play a g note on the 6th string for the C chord but otherwise the string is muted, i believe that is what's meant by that. For the second question about the Bm chord just bar your first finger along the top 5 strings and place the other fingers accordingly, it'll be hard at first but with time you'll get it. Lots of luck.
#7
"0" does not mean you play it.....it typically means you play the string open or unfretted
#8
yeah for the c chord the o on the low e string means that you don't play that string...... as for the b minor chord it is a barre chord so you put your index finger on the 2nd fret creating a "barre" over all the strings while still using your other fingers to form the b minor chord
#9
You all are AMAZING!!! Thank you so much, everyone! That definitely helped a bunch!!!
#10
Quote by mickyddaniels
"0" does not mean you play it.....it typically means you play the string open or unfretted

no it doesn't.

The "o" on those particular chord diagrams mean that those notes are optional, you can play then if you want as they'll fit - they're simply adding a low 5th to the chord. However, for the sake of simplicity I'd leave them out for the time being.
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#11
Quote by steven seagull
no it doesn't.

The "o" on those particular chord diagrams mean that those notes are optional, you can play then if you want as they'll fit - they're simply adding a low 5th to the chord. However, for the sake of simplicity I'd leave them out for the time being.


Thank you Steven Seagull! I appreciate the clarification there!!