#1
I have been teaching a girl bass for a few months now, and she wanted to get her first bass because she had problems with me lending mine to her so she wants to go to GC.

She was a double bassist so she thought she wouldnt have much trouble with the VM Fretless Jazz, I am trying to keep her away from it by telling her why she shouldn't but she is insisting.

So UG Bass forum, I need your help, is there anything I can tell her to keep her off it? She's been playing for like 3 months and she can't really nail the frets so good right now and stuff, but she just wont budge.

Any help? This is urgent.
So an irishman walks out of a bar.
#3
Well, I went backwards... I started up double bass this year, after playing electric bass for several years.

I found it harder a transition from fretted bass to a fretless double bass... but they don't come fretted. It's cause the steps on the upright are much larger than that of a normal bass... However, I did realize that after playing double for a while, playing fretless was so much easier at my friend's...

It may be a good idea to go with it.

--Arojekt.
#4
This is more your fear of teaching than your fear of her not succeeding
Originally posted by germ
all of you shut up, or i swear ill turn this car RIGHT AROUND!!!!!

*closed*

damn. i was never good at magic tricks.
#5
Quote by Chemicalwarfare
This is more your fear of teaching than your fear of her not succeeding


But when she gets told that her tone sucks or summat like that it's gonna be her getting told, not me. :/ That bothers me.

But fine, thanks for the opinions guys, just don't judge and ****.
So an irishman walks out of a bar.
#6
If she knows her intonation on an upright, she should be able to figure it out on a fretless electric.
I <3 bangoodcharlotte

Quote by humperdunk
one time i let my cat has cheezburger. i thought it was pretty funny.
#7
some fretlesses come with lines so you don't have to worry about hitting the wrong.. spots. and personally i love the tone on fretless basses. smooth and warm

if a fretless is what she wants, then you should be supportive of that. she'll be less inclined to learn if you try to force your opinions on her.
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#8
If she has a good ear and can teach herself to play with the ear and not with the eyes then she should get what she wants. If she has a bad ear, then maybe she should develop it some more while playing fretted.

Viola - Her decision made easy - Good ear get it, bad ear get fretted.
Quote by civildp1
It's not rocket surgery.
Quote by Kensai
That was so hot my penis exploded.
Quote by killthekingx
I **ing hate Opeth. They make every other band I know look bad.

Quote by beckyjc
some cockwanks just wan to throw 5 stars at her because she has a vag
#9
How long had she been playing double bass? If she's fairly competent, then it will be no problem for her playing a fretless electric. Mind you, one with lines may be easier.
#10
if she gets fret less she should get one with the fret lines, plus when she goes to the music shop she can try it out for herself.
Scar tissue that I wish you saw
Sarcastic mister know it all
Close your eyes and I’ll kiss you ’cause
With the birds I’ll share...
#11
if she can play an upright then her intonation must be pretty decent, she'll adjust to electric in no time. i think you're more scared of teaching her on a fretless than anything.

remember if she actually wants to learn then she'll learn regardless of whether she has frets, fret lines, dot markers or a blank piece of ebony to finger
Quote by bassmanjoe08
Dan

Don't stop being you <3


Quote by fatgoogle
I think after this relentless adding for the last 10 mins, that Dan is the coolest looking. Goddamn welsh people and my great etc etc etc etc etc granddad is welsh.
#12
Caveat: I don't play upright myself.

But...I know several people who do play both fretless and upright and most of them have stated that intonation issues are harder on the electric fretless than the upright. I am not entirely sure why that is the case.

There is also that distinctive mwah issue. Its great, its lovely but its never going to be anything else than what it is. Its not a sound that is going to be appropriate for everything you play.
#13
My guess is that (Jaco mentioned something like this) on upright, the radius/thickness of the neck changes much more quickly than on electric. You can kinda "feel" where you are on upright by neck thickness alone better than you can on electric. The fact that an electric has a neck past the 7th position (or wherever the neck joins the body) may also have something to do with that.

But let's forget upright experience. In my opinion, and I've said this before, learning on electric and learning on fretless electric should have the same difficulty (when you learn PROPERLY). You should be pressing down on the same spots on both basses at all times. The fretless is a bit more unforgiving and discouraging at first, but that forces you out of bad habits and sloppy playing much earlier than on fretted. On fretted, the PC "do what you want as long as it makes you happy!" cop-out works for the most part, but on fretless, there are wrong ways to play.

So, in conclusion, I encourage fretless as a first bass - you'll probably get better faster... assuming you have the drive and determination to do so.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#14
Quote by anarkee
But...I know several people who do play both fretless and upright and most of them have stated that intonation issues are harder on the electric fretless than the upright. I am not entirely sure why that is the case.

My guess is, on top of what Fitz said about radius and where the neck joins the body, is overtones.

With an electric bass, the electric amplification will give you the option where, 99% of the time, you will choose to have more overtones than you would on an upright. Thus, incorrect intonation would be easier to notice, since there is greater frequency difference between two high notes a half-step apart and two low notes.

Moreover, the upright (assuming you're talking a viol here) relies on acoustics to amplify its sound, whereas an electric relies on, well, electrics. If I'm not mistaken, the reverberation of the soundwaves within the larger volume of the acoustic upright gives more of a distortion radius to the soundwaves, in comparison to the lower reverberation of an electric amplified through pickups. Distortion radius has a chance of covering the correct intonation if the core tone is slightly off. Which is why it's harder to tell when an overdriven guitar is out of tune than, say, a monotone synthesizer. Hopefully one of those isn't out of tune!

These two points are both conjecture on my part, and I fully expect somebody to tell me why I'm a dumb stupid idiot moron who needs to study his wave physics more. I'm a Literature major, leave me alone.

...Finally, to TS, I agree with Fitz, the more frustrating aspect of the fretless would force better habits and better ear. To think, this post could have been two lines long.
Les Claypool
Geddy Lee
Robert DeLeo
Flea

Weileder

...Coincidence? I think not.
#15
Quote by Leper Affinity
If she has a good ear and can teach herself to play with the ear and not with the eyes then she should get what she wants. If she has a bad ear, then maybe she should develop it some more while playing fretted.

Viola - Her decision made easy - Good ear get it, bad ear get fretted.



I don't think she's after a viola at all
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
your speaker is not broken in?

if i where you, i wouldnt play through it until it is
#16
She's making the right choice buddy. If she's a double bassist, she should already have built up her intonation and whatnot.
Last.FM

Quote by Applehead
There are some things in life that are universally "good":

Sex, pizza, the smell of fresh washing and slap bass.
#18
We got her VM fretless yesterday, she loved it.

The only problem we encountered was that GC strung it with roundwounds so before teaching her slides and **** I bought her a set of flatwounds.

She really likes the bass, and she loved the bass with those strings. She's got pretty good ear too, so intonation won't be much of a hassle.

Thanks everyone, specially Fitzy.
So an irishman walks out of a bar.
#20
Quote by watchingmefall
Flatwounds on fretless? that's for pussies.


Or people that like a mellower-non-JacoPastorious sound (GASP! A fretless player would want that!? WHY!?) I know I do. In fact in addition I also roll my tone nob all the way down, and solo my split coil.

I'm glad she decided on the fretless, but god, why god the Squier VM. Most people here know my rants about them, and it's too late anyways, by WHY.
#21
Quote by elemenohpee
Or people that like a mellower-non-JacoPastorious sound (GASP! A fretless player would want that!? WHY!?) I know I do. In fact in addition I also roll my tone nob all the way down, and solo my split coil.

I'm glad she decided on the fretless, but god, why god the Squier VM. Most people here know my rants about them, and it's too late anyways, by WHY.

Geez, I was kidding, that's why I put the smiley at last.

What's your rant on the Squier VM? I've never heard it.