#1
ok so Im kinda new here so I guess an introduction is in order
my name is Ed Gunderson, Im 16 and Ive been pickin for about 4 years now
Ive collected a few guitars since I started playing and one of them is an acoustic twelve string
if any body knows anything about this awesome guitar please post
tunings are what im specifically looking for but anything basic would help
just any info..
thanks,
-Ed Gun
#2
There are all kinds of tunings it just depends on what you are looking for. My personal favorites are

C-G-C-G-C-e

D-A-D-G-A-d

D-A-D-D-A-d

E-C-G-D-A-d

B-F#-B-F#-B-c#
"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, then the world will know peace." - Jimi Hendrix
#3
well you just play and tune it like a 6 string E A D G B E
e a d g b e

I dropped mine and the headstock came of in a clean split so make sure you got strap locks its cost as much to fix it as it did to buy
=========

Nathnialm

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#4
Oh and if your looking for some stuff to play on a twelve string look up Wish You Where Here by Pink Floyd and look up John Butler as well. If he isn't playing on a dobro he is playing a twelve string.
"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, then the world will know peace." - Jimi Hendrix
#5
Regarding tunings, a 12 string guitar has the same 6 strings that a 6 string guitar has but each string has a 'twin'. For the lowest 4 strings (EADG) the twin is tuned to the note an octave higher, on the highest 2 strings (BE) the twin is tuned to the same pitch.
For ease of viewing, standard tuning for a 12 string guitar would be EeAaDdGgBbEe.

Regarding the G string's twin, some people tune it an octave higher, others tune it to the same pitch and some, including John Butler, remove it altogether.

Like RedSox_o4 said though, 12 string guitars can be put into alternate tunings like any guitar.

As for basic info on 12 strings, google '12-string-guitar' or look it up on wikipedia or something. It will save someone a lot of typing.
#6
is wish you were here played on a twelve string?
it sounds like a six to me..
I know hotel california is a twelve
any other songs played on a twelve?
#7
Quote by tom183
Regarding tunings, a 12 string guitar has the same 6 strings that a 6 string guitar has but each string has a 'twin'. For the lowest 4 strings (EADG) the twin is tuned to the note an octave higher, on the highest 2 strings (BE) the twin is tuned to the same pitch.
For ease of viewing, standard tuning for a 12 string guitar would be EeAaDdGgBbEe.

Regarding the G string's twin, some people tune it an octave higher, others tune it to the same pitch and some, including John Butler, remove it altogether.

Like RedSox_o4 said though, 12 string guitars can be put into alternate tunings like any guitar.

As for basic info on 12 strings, google '12-string-guitar' or look it up on wikipedia or something. It will save someone a lot of typing.


What's the rationale behind leaving off the G twin? I have seen that done by several artists... I must say that it seems to me to be the one that is the most "squirrly" to tune on the twelve - when I tune it by ear it's the one I have to spend the most time on...
#8
^--- there are two main reasons it is left off. the most common reason is that it just sorta sounds funny. it's actually the highest pitch string on a 12 string guitar and some people think it sounds odd to have the highest pitch in the middle of the strings instead of on one extreme end.

the other reason is that, because it is tuned so high, it breaks all the time

and to Ed: that link provided above is a great resource for tunings. check that out for sure! and welcome to UG!
#9
Oh good - I'm not the only person who thinks it sounds "funny"... Maybe I'll go home and take it off tonight. It always gives me pause when I tune those G strings...
#10
Quote by jimtaka
^--- there are two main reasons it is left off. the most common reason is that it just sorta sounds funny. it's actually the highest pitch string on a 12 string guitar and some people think it sounds odd to have the highest pitch in the middle of the strings instead of on one extreme end.

the other reason is that, because it is tuned so high, it breaks all the time



Just to add to this post:

It also feels odd to the fingers to have the highest pitch (thinnest) string in the middle.

Also, by removing it it takes away some of the guitars brightness. Its balanced my guitars tone nicely.
Let me tell you about heartache and the loss of god
Wandering, wandering in hopeless night
Out here in the perimeter there are no stars

Out here we is stoned
Immaculate.
#11
Quote by jimtaka
^--- there are two main reasons it is left off. the most common reason is that it just sorta sounds funny. it's actually the highest pitch string on a 12 string guitar and some people think it sounds odd to have the highest pitch in the middle of the strings instead of on one extreme end.

the other reason is that, because it is tuned so high, it breaks all the time

and to Ed: that link provided above is a great resource for tunings. check that out for sure! and welcome to UG!



hey thanks alot man
#12
what about gauges?
are the two top E strings the same?
I was under the impression that each extra string was a little smaller
#13
Quote by EkGunz_19
what about gauges?
are the two top E strings the same?
I was under the impression that each extra string was a little smaller


Lightest two (E and B) are the same octave & the same gauge (10 usually). The other four are octave strings and so differeng gauges.
Let me tell you about heartache and the loss of god
Wandering, wandering in hopeless night
Out here in the perimeter there are no stars

Out here we is stoned
Immaculate.
#14
Ek,
Welcome to the world of 12 strings. Remember ther is a lot of tention on the neck, so be sure to loosen the strings after you finish playing. (a lot of people tune all the strings down a half step and then place a capo on th 1st fret. It really helps with the tension)

Oh yeah, learn "A Horse with No Name" by America

Dish
#15
Okay so, I currently share a twelve string with someone, who won't let me try any alternate tunings, however I've been toying with the idea of tuning the octave strings on the four lower strings down to fifths. I've been looking everywhere, and no one has said anything about the possibility of doing that.
#16
Quote by EkGunz_19
is wish you were here played on a twelve string?
it sounds like a six to me..
I know hotel california is a twelve
any other songs played on a twelve?

Wish You Were Here is indeed a 12 string.

Others that come to mind;

I Appear Missing - Queens of the Stone Age
Zebra - John Butler Trio
Mr Tambourine Man - The Byrds
I Stay Away - Alice In Chains
Breaking the Girl - Red Hot Chili Peppers
Space Oddity - David Bowie
Free Fallin' - Tom Petty
The Song Remains the Same - Led Zeppelin
It's an opinion. It's subjective. And I'm right, anyway.
#17
Quote by EkGunz_19
is wish you were here played on a twelve string?
it sounds like a six to me..
I know hotel california is a twelve
any other songs played on a twelve?
Yes, it is. "Comfortably Numb" is allegedly played in "Nashville Tuning", which in this case amounts to two guitars. One is in standard 6 string tuning, the other tuned to the octave pairs of a 12 string.

If you go through Pink Floyd's, "The Wall", you'll probably find a few more instances of 12 strings, or at the very least, songs which would be suitable for 12 string.

You really shouldn't tune a 12 string to E-E standard. There's too much tension on the neck, and all sorts of bad shit starts to happen a couple of years down the road. Your primary tuning should be D-D standard intervals, then capo when you play. (D, G, C, F, Bb, d, low to high).

The problem in breaking the high G string doesn't present itself, UNLESS, you miss the 1st octave up when you restring. I have those skinny G strings that are months old. (They're tuned to the F below G-4).

The problem with the high G string is, the G pair SOUNDS higher the the B and E unison pairs.

The Who's "Substitute" is normally considered a 12 string song. When you play the intro on a 12, the 3rd and 4th strings are supplying the melody notes you would have to play on the e-1 & B-2 with a 6 string. You have to get into "12 string think" when you decide which string you're going to play a melody note on. Basically you drop 2 strings and move up a position or two.

12 strings are notoriously difficult to tune. I use a strobe tuner, which is extremely accurate. Another thing is, you should select songs that are suitable for "pickin", which means you should be playing a lot of arpeggiated note, so as not to bring attention to said tuning errors, as they become apparent up when you're strumming all 6 (12) strings. The unison pairs are particularly treacherous if they're off even a slight bit.

Everything The Byrds" ever did had a Rickenbacker 12 string, played by Roger McGuinn.

Use your imagination, and arrange songs around the 12 string. You can't let 6 string convention dictate your playing style.

BTW, almost all "Golden Protest Songs", are played on a 12 string. Twelves were probably more prevalent during the 60's. They're obviously not intended for today's "shredding".

Quote by Slap-happy

Space Oddity - David Bowie
Free Fallin' - Tom Petty
The Song Remains the Same - Led Zeppelin
All three of these players use the 12 string extensively, it's not limited to those 3 songs.

Plus, you missed the most famous, most often covered Zeppelin song, "Stairway to Heaven". Jimmy Page stills laughs about it when people think that song was recorded on the double neck it was played on stage with.

Tom Petty is expressly guilty of attempting to sound like Bob Dylan, with the Byrds as a backup band...
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 18, 2013,
#18
I was giving (relatively) simple, well known examples.

Stairway... sure, but that's a cliché.
It's an opinion. It's subjective. And I'm right, anyway.
#19
Quote by Slap-happy
...[ ]....Stairway... sure, but that's a cliché.
Isn't my, "often covered", a bit more tactful?

An interesting thing about the Rickenbacker electric 12, is that George Harrison played one. Roger McGuinn heard the noise, but was a bit confused when he only, (at a quick glance), saw 6 tuning keys. (6 stick out like a flat top steel string, and 6 point toward the back of the headstock like a classical guitar).



Roger got his hands on a Rick of his very own, and the Byrds' sound was born!

So I guess we should mention that The Beatles used a 12 string from time to time as well....

On a side note, have I mentioned this thread is from 2008?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 18, 2013,