#1
Thanks for looking into this thread:

I was noodling around last night and found something I thought sounded good and bluesy. But I can't figure out what scale/key these notes might belong to. Here are the tab and the notes:

High E:------------------------------------------------------------
........B: ----------12--10----------------12--10-----------------
........G:--8--11------------8--|--8--11-----------8--|--8--11--4

D#, F#, B, A are the ones I'm playing ...
and D fits.

It starts on D# but B seems to be the tonic.

Can anyone tell me what the heck this is?

(I only recently started exploring beyond the pentatonic minor, BTW).

Thanks
#5
Quote by Gordita Supreme
I believe you could look at it as G minor blues.


No, G minor would have a Bb and an F natural.

Cokeisbetter probably has a better guess than me, I didn't even think of B Mixolydian.
#10
I suppose it could be any of the modes of E major, but if you think B is the root, then I won't object to calling it B Mixo. This can be a nice substitute for the B minor pentatonic scale over the B7 chord in a B major blues.
#11
Quote by :-D
No, G minor would have a Bb and an F natural.

Cokeisbetter probably has a better guess than me, I didn't even think of B Mixolydian.


Wow I fail. I should have seen that it was B mixolydian right away.

I'm sad now.
#12
Quote by Gordita Supreme
Wow I fail. I should have seen that it was B mixolydian right away.

I'm sad now.


No, it's okay.

I understand why you thought that based on the fact that D# is the #5 in the key of G.
Last edited by :-D at Mar 18, 2008,
#13
Thanks for all the quick responses, players!

I just expanded the riff I wrote down in the top post using the B Mixolydian. Adding the E, G# and C# fit perfectly, so that is definately the scale that goes with the sound I was hearing/playing.

Wow, I love this scale!

Up until now, I haven't been able to decide what to move on to from the pentatonics. I tried the Natural Minor, which is sad and lovely, and the Major, which is outgoing and confident, but those weren't really giving me what I wanted.

So, the Mixolydian is one of the modes of the major scale, right? Would you advise that I take on learning all the modes now? Or are the other modes for different types of music?

Thanks again!
#14
Quote by Veracity
So, the Mixolydian is one of the modes of the major scale, right? Would you advise that I take on learning all the modes now? Or are the other modes for different types of music?
If you get how the major scale, the minor pentatonic scale, intervals, and chord construction work, then move on to modes. They're really not that useful, but they're good to know. The "learn your theory" link in my sig goes through the basics all the way up to modes of scales other than the major scale (yes, that can happen). The beginning will likely bore you, but read it anyway, just to make sure you know all the basics; the circle of fifths is backwards though, so kindly ignore that.

We have lots of threads about mode applications in here. Once you get how modes are constructed, look for those threads and feel free to start a new thread with any questions you have; don't bump old threads.


#15
Quote by Veracity
Thanks for all the quick responses, players!

I just expanded the riff I wrote down in the top post using the B Mixolydian. Adding the E, G# and C# fit perfectly, so that is definately the scale that goes with the sound I was hearing/playing.

Wow, I love this scale!

Up until now, I haven't been able to decide what to move on to from the pentatonics. I tried the Natural Minor, which is sad and lovely, and the Major, which is outgoing and confident, but those weren't really giving me what I wanted.

So, the Mixolydian is one of the modes of the major scale, right? Would you advise that I take on learning all the modes now? Or are the other modes for different types of music?

Thanks again!


Mixolydian, is a dominant mode. It has a minor seventh, but a major third. It is usually unstable, but was probably what you were looking for, because it is in between the major and minor scales. You might also like the Dorian mode (1, 2, b3, 4, 5, 6, b7), as it is more major than the natural minor, but is still a minor scale.