#1
Before you ask, no, it's not my amp. I have tried it through 3 different amps, and mucked around with the EQ's.

My guitar is really trebly, I didn't notice the change, but it would have been like that for maybe 2-7 days. It sounds awful. I have opened up my pickguard, and there isn't any obvious problems... what do you suggest? Keep in mind that in the last 3 months I have installed a kill-switch and replaced my vol. pot with a 50k log.

Thanks in advance!
#2
Did you check all the connections when you opened up your pickguard? Was it really trebly immediately after you put in the killswitch and new volume pot? Is it all the pickups that are really trebly or just one of them?
#3
All of the pickups are trebly. The killswitch and vol pot has nothing to do with it - I installed them about 3 months ago, and the problem only appeared a week ago, max.
#4
Quote by BGSM
Before you ask, no, it's not my amp. I have tried it through 3 different amps, and mucked around with the EQ's.

My guitar is really trebly, I didn't notice the change, but it would have been like that for maybe 2-7 days. It sounds awful. I have opened up my pickguard, and there isn't any obvious problems... what do you suggest? Keep in mind that in the last 3 months I have installed a kill-switch and replaced my vol. pot with a 50k log.

Thanks in advance!


Do you mean a 500K log? If you do then that is your problem. Put back in the 250K. If it really is a 50K then there are a couple other things you can look at. If all your pickup have the problem then it's not your pickup. Your switch wouldn't make anything sound bright, which takes us to the pots.

I guess it is possible that when you were wiring stuff you accedently turned your trebble bleed cap into a bypass cap which is letting all your trebble through all the time rather than filtering it off to ground.

It's also possible that you broke lead or soldering joint on the cap so it's just not doing anything. These bleed caps always suck a little bit of your trebble so taking it off is like turning your tone knob to 11.
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Last edited by CorduroyEW at Mar 19, 2008,
#6
Quote by CorduroyEW
Do you mean a 500K log? If you do then that is your problem. Put back in the 250K


If its been fine till now, its probably not the new 500k log. I'd say recheck all the connections, then if all else fails, put the old 250k back in.

Edit: got in too late. Still, just check that all the connections are securely soldered
#8
hmmm, i guess see if the old pot works, and if not, then I guess you're gonna have to take it in for a repair or something..
#11
Hmm... Any other suggestions? I haven't tried soldering it in yet, I have doubts that it would make to much of a difference.
#12
did u accidentally knock the pickup selector from neck to bridge pup?

edit: nvm.
Sincerely,
Shitstirrer
#13
well, it sounds to me like it's going to be the capacitors in some form or another. mabie one of them's blown or short circuited somewhere
#15
Hi, no - I haven't! That's the one on one of the pots, right? It's red. Is that known to make it really trebly if it's blown?

It's an old guitar, so it's probably likely that the cap will go at one time or another.
#16
^that is what I was going on about before

Quote by CorduroyEW

I guess it is possible that when you were wiring stuff you accedently turned your trebble bleed cap into a bypass cap which is letting all your trebble through all the time rather than filtering it off to ground.

It's also possible that you broke lead or soldering joint on the cap so it's just not doing anything. These bleed caps always suck a little bit of your trebble so taking it off is like turning your tone knob to 11.


If your cap were blown then you would be filtering off all of your signal to ground and you wouldn't have any volume. You have the opposite problem which would make me think that your cap has been disconnected.
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#17
Thanks Corduroy - for some reason, I didn't see that post before.

I will open up my guitar tonight and check it.

Can I check the cap with a multimeter?
#18
well, I can't be certain, but, if the multimeter reads a small resistance, that doesn't increase with time, then it's probably shagged. I think a working capacitor should read as an open circuit. this is all speculation, however: it's been ages since i done ANY practical work.
#19
dude buy a new cap, at like radioshack just to give it a try. to me, as soon as i read this BAD CAP immediately came to mind.
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#20
I'll have a hard time finding the same cap at Jaycar and Dick Smith (Radioshack equivalent)...
#21
You can test that it blocks direct current with your mutimeter and an extra battary but we already know it's. If your cap is blown then you will be having a very bassy sounding guitar with almost no volume but you are having the opposite so at this point I wouldn't bother testing the cap to see if it's good. 1st check thatt your cap is wired into the right place and that the soldering joints are good. If all that checks out then check that your tone pots are working properly.
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#22
Oh ok, thanks. I think I'll just take it to McCanns music's guitar tech on Monday, I can't be bothered opening it up again to find nothing wrong with it. Hopefully they can spot and fix the problem.