#1
Well it's time for a new comp. So, I need your help to gather me a parts list that I will be ordering from overclockers.co.uk.

Budget=£500

I have a fair idea of what I want but here goes:

Mobo: no idea, intel though, not AMD
CPU: intel quadcore of some sorts (confused about compatability etc)
GFXC: 8800GTS
RAM:2GB (this is where my problem is: compatibility with motherboard etc)
HDD: I have a 250GB
Soundcard: I have one to cannibalise
Case: No idea
Have all peripherals (screen, keyboard, mouse etc)

Cheers!

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Quote by MrCarrot
Oranges are actually a revolution though - they're the next step from Rectos IMO.
#2
If you want to build a custom computer, use the "build a computer" function from http://www.cyberpowerpc.com/ and then write down what you came up with at the end. After that, go to www.newegg.com and order your parts from there. With the cyber power computer builder, you wont make the mistake of having incompatible parts with each other (i believe). BTW, are you using this for gaming, or for work (be honest)
#3
Don't get the components from either of those; try Scan or MicroDirect or CCL. First, find the CPU you want (the Scan website has generally very good descriptions and tech specs www.scan.co.uk) and write down the socket it needs and its model number/name or whatever. Then, look under the Motherboards section and try to find a good board (Asus or Abit or someone) which matches the socket and will allow that speed of processor. Once you have your motherboard chosen (bear in mind number of PCI Express sockets, PCI Express speed, memory capability, RAID/no RAID), look on its description to see what memory it takes e.g. DDR2 PC2-4300, PC2-5300, PC2-6400 etc etc and then take a trip over to the Memory section to find memory of a matching spec. Etc etc.

EDIT: Scan have listed some compatiable components which all look good for this quad core Intel CPU:
http://www.scan.co.uk/Products/ProductInfo.asp?WebProductID=643237
Last edited by gpel at Mar 19, 2008,
#4
I will be able to help you out with this, i built my pc. I can't do it right now though as i am not at home.

I will post later when i get in.
Derp.
#5
You will not be able to get a computer that good for 500. Simple
Quote by StratPat
****, nah I've never got anything like that, I just get 'YOU'VE WON THE MOTHERFUUCKIN LOTTERY IN IREELAND SEND ME UR DETAILS N U GET 10 000 000 DOLLLAAZZ"

But I'm sure some paid hitman wouldn't email that, and would have better grammar
#6
Okay dude. First off, head over to a place like pcmech.com and ask for advice. Great site, I use it whenever I have questions to ask.

Now I'm going to give you some of my own advice, and right off the bat I can say this. No decent rig will be worth around $500, period. You're talking thousands. Especially for quad core processors and latest generation graphics cards, and all the newest types of RAM and storage mediums, not to mention cooling and optical drives.

A computer starts with a motherboard. These days, motherboards are mainly manufactured for use with either AMD or Intel chipsets and CPUs. It's a personal preference as to which one you choose.

Next you have your CPU. There's a number of things you're going to want to look at here, and the first thing to take into account is what you're planning on using this rig for. More often than not, going all out with multiple cores is a waste of money and recourses, because for an average to above average gamer or workstation pc you just won't be using all that raw processing power. I say 2 cores max, somewhere in the 2Ghz range.

Make sure your motherboard is compatible with this CPU, and sports the same bus speeds, or again, you'll just end up wasting resources. Always remember to make sure you have the right socket type.

Let's talk about RAM. RAM is expensive, and you need it for any system. You're going to want to make sure your RAM is compatible with your motherboard in terms of bus speeds, socket types and capacity. For example, the computer I'm on is running 2 x 512Mb DDR SD sticks at 533Mhz, but I'm not quite sure what socket type. (I installed it a long time ago)

Next you're going to want to look at HDDs and optical drives. There is such a large market out there, and again, it all comes down to what your rig is going to be used for. A general rule is that the higher the RPM and lower the latency, the better. Today we use SATA cables to connect most drives, so make sure your motherboard is SATA compatible. Don't funk out when a crappy IDE drive arrives in the mail because you bought on impulse.

PSU. You're gonna need power, so make sure you get a power unit by a well known brand that can provide plenty of juice to your system, and then some.

I'm sick of typing now, but you get the picture. Do your own research, and you should be able to build your own rig no worries. If you're a beginner, I don't recommend even thinking about overclocking until your 2nd or 3rd build.
Last edited by Jcore44 at Mar 19, 2008,
#7
Quote by Jcore44
Now I'm going to give you some of my own advice, and right off the bat I can say this. No decent rig will be worth around $500, period. You're talking thousands. Especially for quad core processors and latest generation graphics cards, and all the newest types of RAM and storage mediums, not to mention cooling and optical drives.


Don't mean to be pedantic but he said £500 which roughly equals $1000; he already has a good graphics card, a sounds card and all peripherals, so £500 for CPU, motherboard, memory and case should go a long way.
#8
Quote by Jcore44
If you're a beginner, I don't recommend even thinking about overclocking until your 2nd or 3rd build.


Or even overclocking at all.. Unless you have really good cooling.. Not worth killing your pc for a few extra GHZ... There are risks involved
Quote by StratPat
****, nah I've never got anything like that, I just get 'YOU'VE WON THE MOTHERFUUCKIN LOTTERY IN IREELAND SEND ME UR DETAILS N U GET 10 000 000 DOLLLAAZZ"

But I'm sure some paid hitman wouldn't email that, and would have better grammar
#9
I use Intel Socket LGA775, its fast and is compatible with all new Intel Processors.

I recommend getting a good dual core instead of a crappy quad core. There is no point getting a quad core yet anyway - programs are only just beginning to use dual core as it is.

Get a 3 - 4GHz dual core instead of a 1 - 2GHz quad.
Derp.
#10
Quote by gpel
Don't mean to be pedantic but he said £500 which roughly equals $1000; he already has a good graphics card, a sounds card and all peripherals, so £500 for CPU, motherboard, memory and case should go a long way.


Of course, pounds not dollars, I didn't think of that. But I still don't think it will go far enough. If he's already got that stuff and he's looking to upgrade the backbone of his system, then the chances are he's going to need to upgrade everything else as well.

If I were to go out and buy a new motherboard, processor and memory tomorrow with the intention of plugging all my current hardware in I'd have to be dreaming. For this particular system I'm still running IDE HDDs and opticals, and standard DDR RAM.

I'd have to upgrade everything. You're probably asking what the **** am I doing with such a dinosaur anyway, and come to think of it, I'm starting to ask myself the same thing.
#11
Thanks guys. Well after some looking around here's what I've come up with:


Totals at £641

Considering I may not get the quad-core, is everything else ok?

Also, will I be able to re-use my copy of windows XP for this computer if I don't use my old one?

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Quote by MrCarrot
Oranges are actually a revolution though - they're the next step from Rectos IMO.