#1
Ok so I learned about 12 Bar blues on the UG music style section of articles. Ive always wanted to learn blues.

Theres only one thing i dont get (so far..)

The article says that when you approach the V chord (E if in the key of A) that you should build up tension, then release it on the V chord.

Can someone explain this point better ?
Thanks
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#2
then release it on the V chord.

you mean the I chord?

dunno maybe it means you could make the V chord a 7...
#3
start the bar playing soft (pp) and gradually build up volume and aggression to a loud volume (ff) and maybe even add a couple of semi-quavers in there for good measure at the end
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#4
Sorry. I meant like what kind of notes ? To build up tension do I play notes out of key or those not included in the chord being played at that point, or notes leading to the next chord etc.
|-----| Gear |-----|

Ibanez RG(cnt remember)
Marshall MG30DFX
Line 6 Guitar Port


YOUTUBE PR0NZZ
#6
When you reach the V your solo, you should try to make your solo part in that section sound "unfinished". So don't land on the root note.
You're telling a story in blues (or at least thats how I play my solos):

I use the first four bars of your "I" chord position to begin my story(solo).
I use the next two bars of "IV" chord positions to describe some kind of interesting detail or an important happening in the story.
The next two bars of the "I" chord position is used by me to come back to the center of the story.
THEN as you play the "V" you get to the peak of your solo and thats the part where should make it sound unfinished.
Then you can release this tesion that you built up on the "V" by making your solo sound finished in the last three bars of "IV" , "I" and "V" again.
(that's not a general rule, just how I try to play)
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#7
Quote by iruka2998
Sorry. I meant like what kind of notes ? To build up tension do I play notes out of key or those not included in the chord being played at that point, or notes leading to the next chord etc.


Try just playing some line from the A Blues scale over the I (A7). When it changes to
E7, target the G# and try to land on it on the first beat of E7. I think you'll hear the
release.
#8
Since the V7 chord is very associated with the harmonic scale, in my ears at least. The harmonic scale has a very rough and chromaticy sound, which creates tension. Usually what I just do, is screw around with the notes of the V7, and then run down the arpeggio, ending on the leading note of the tonic, and back into tonic. Thats just my "trademark"thing lol.
#9
Quote by iruka2998
Ok so I learned about 12 Bar blues on the UG music style section of articles. Ive always wanted to learn blues.

Theres only one thing i dont get (so far..)

The article says that when you approach the V chord (E if in the key of A) that you should build up tension, then release it on the V chord.

Can someone explain this point better ?
Thanks
Hey iruka2998. Can you give me a link to the article you read? Cause maybe I can help you more that way. The beauty of the 12bar is in it's raw simplicity so I don't want to give you an overly complex answer if I don't need to. The 12bar, when you first learn it, should be all about fun.
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