#1

this is  an Em blues pentatonic

e------------------------------0-3
b------------------------0-3------
g-----------------0-2-3----------
D------------0-2------------------
A-----0-1-2----------------------
E-0-3-----------------------------


But sometimes there is a G# (4 example fourth fret on E string).Sounds good but it should be wrong looking at the standard pentatonic box.Why?
#2
what you got is a E blues scale. if you add the G#, its not a pentatonic or a blues because penta means 5 notes in the scale and blues adds a flatted 5th. A G# is a natural 3rd. Its used within blues and jazz. you can use it if it sounds sweet but it's not a pentatonic or blues scale.
#3
G# is a VERY strong note to play over an E7 chord because it's the 3rd of the
chord. The E pentatonic minor/blues scale has no G#, it's a minor scale and has
a natural G. It's sort of a Blues oddity that you play a minor scale over a major
chord. The G# is NOT part of that scale, but it is *frequently* added in because its
such a strong note. You can think of it as coming from E major pentatonic which
you can freely mix with E blues over the E7 chord.
#4
Quote by edg
G# is a VERY strong note to play over an E7 chord because it's the 3rd of the
chord. The E pentatonic minor/blues scale has no G#, it's a minor scale and has
a natural G. It's sort of a Blues oddity that you play a minor scale over a major
chord. The G# is NOT part of that scale, but it is *frequently* added in because its
such a strong note. You can think of it as coming from E major pentatonic which
you can freely mix with E blues over the E7 chord.


I'd agree with that. Basically the G# is used to hint at or give shades of a major scale, but only when played over a major or major 7th chord.
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