#1
Hi guys,

I was wondering if anyone has had experiance with using Oak for making guitar bodies. I scored a huge peice of Oak I cut into 4 pieces big enough to use for four full bodies. This stuff is very dense and heavy and seems to be a great wood to use but I never really have seen anyone use it. I looked thru the site and see many woods as a choice but again no Oak. I was wondering if I should go ahead and use it. The best part is it was free! LOL


John
#2
you could always make one out of it and just attach a crap neck and see how it turns out. is it a decent looking wood? i think it might be interesting since i have access to oak as well
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#5
Oak is a very heavy wood. For tonewoods, I've always heard not to use it....never really got a good excuse though.... look it up
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#7
It must not be that great of a tone wood. Warmoth doesn't even have it listed in their "Wood Description".
#8
eh, if ye search, i think there's plenty of threads similar to this ane
#9
If it was free, you have nothing to lose, so you might aswell give it a shot. Maybe make a body, if you like it, make more. If not then try using it as a top.
#10
i like oak
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#11
I've heard that it is less tolerant to climate change than other woods so it could end up forming cracks or warp if the climate in your area is very bipolar

I'd say just go for it though anyways.
#12
Quote by Axecutioner
I've heard that it is less tolerant to climate change than other woods so it could end up forming cracks or warp if the climate in your area is very bipolar

I'd say just go for it though anyways.

hopefully illinois isnt too bipolar for oak. i would love to make a guitar and oak is a lot cheaper than other woods. but yeh TS you might as well go for it if its free.
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#13
oak is actually more dense than the typical cheap guitar woods like alder, basswood, and poplar

its more on par with maple, white ash, and quality mahogany

but because of the long open grain structure of oak is why i think it doesn't really get used as a guitar wood, you're pretty much left with just staining the body

unless you like dealing with good amounts of fillers, glazes, and sealers

other than that, i think using oak would be worth a shot
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#14
Quote by Kill Rockstar
It must not be that great of a tone wood. Warmoth doesn't even have it listed in their "Wood Description".



Warmoth don't list all tone woods, mainly the popular/traditional timbers.
#16
"Oak. Oak is coarse and its large pores are hard to fill, but its availability in home improvement stores makes it widely available. Quartered oak is common at lumberyards. The only thing wrong with oak instruments is that they look so much like furniture. Quartered stock displays an irregular pattern of medullary rays that add interest to the ring lines, though filling the pores with dark material draws the eye away from the rays. Oak loves to bend and is seldom cantankerous in this regard. the hardness of the wood varies across the same board, so machine sanding alone will leave the surface wavy. The trick is to machine sand and then block sand with each grit. White oak seems to have a slightly finer texture than red oak, otherwise, I don't distinguish between the two. This wood is so far outside of musicians' expectations that oak instruments always take them by surprise, especially if they hear them before seeing them. In areas where oak is commonly burned for heat, it may be held in low regard for any other use. Be brave, though. Oak is fun to work with."
From the link provided by a4lrocker.
Weekend Warrior
#17
people use pine for bodies (successfully), but none of the big companies do, so there's not really much of a reason not to play with whatever wood you want, if you do it right
#18
Quote by JimPlaysGuitar
Brian May?



I'm building 2 guitars right now that are made of oak and poplar (for the body's)

Oak is hard to work with compared to most other common wood. But tone wise it's good.

and yeah, brian may
#19
Thanks guys. The wood has a very good grain it's already been preped and it has a very good finish on it but that will have to be stripped. Most likely I will be putting an exotic wood veneer on the tops. I'll post some pics of the wood as soon as I can. This wood is very old so I would imagine if it was going to crack or warp it would have done it by now. It has been sitting in my friends basement for 3 or 4 years now. I got it back then and was going to use it as a work bench but then thought it was too good to waste so I decided to save it for something more important.


John
#20
Hi guys,

I cut two bodies and Oak just might be too heavy! They are like hanging 2 cinder blocks off your neck and shoulder! LOL I figure after I route them and cut them for the neck thru that should take some weight out but then after you add the pups electronics and hardware it will be back to about the same weight. My camera is not working or I would post pics. It's something fairly simple and I should have it back soon. I was wondering if chambering them might be an idea I should think about that should take a lot of weight off and might even help the tone. This Oak is very old and from old growth so it has some nice tight grain but I'll know better afer I sand and seal the wood.
Last edited by johnro6659 at Mar 30, 2008,
#21
Quote by JimPlaysGuitar
Brian May?

exactly! chamber it and put it's pups out of phase