#1
So my friends and I are making a movie and we need an guitar that looks old and kind of beat up.

What is the best way to "age" an acoustic guitar?

I suppose we could just take some sandpaper to it but of course we want it to look natural so are there any good techniques?


And a little off topic but I might as well ask so I wont have to make a new thread but what would be the best way to drop a guitar so that it doesn't break?
#2
just take all the junk (Bridge, tuning keys, nut, basically any working parts) off it and kick it around in a parking lot or something

or you could artificially wear it, which would suck

me and my friends shot a bass with a pellet gun.. but that's irrelevant
#3
Quote by Snorglorf
just take all the junk (Bridge, tuning keys, nut, basically any working parts) off it and kick it around in a parking lot or something

or you could artificially wear it, which would suck

me and my friends shot a bass with a pellet gun.. but that's irrelevant

I wouldnt do that on a acoustic, it might break Lol...
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why not, i started using the zakk wylde boomers and now every third note i hit is a pinch harmonic


#4
Scuff and scratch up any shiny bits. Take a metal peice (not sharp) and scratch on it like a pic would so that you can quickly make it look like it has been used alot. I don't know if I would use sand paper, but maybe run over the glossy parts with steel wool. Remember to be random and un-even. Don't really plan much, just stab at it. Maybe chip some of the edges. Darker colors make it look older too, so if you give it a kinda un-even, smudgy coating of darker oil. Like... I dunno. A type of lubricant oil or something. Rub in some dirt. How do you make new pants look used? You give them HELL.
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#5
Just get some light sand paper and rub it around. If you want it to look cracked, **** with the humidity. Keep it in like a really humid area and move it back and forth from there to a really dry area, then just leave it in the dry area.

This is how my French teacher's old Landola acoustic is all worn. She's not only hadit for like 30 years, but she's gone from Europe to North Africa and then here, so it's been exposed to the elements.

Alternatively, get a sandblaster or a leaf blower and blow sand on it.
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#8
Thanks this is all really helpful.

I like the idea of staining it....
oil wouldn't work though as we don't have it on hand and we need this in two days,
is there any other substance that we could use?

Aarons6890's rust idea is also pretty cool but how long would that take?
#9
Quote by superunknown
Thanks this is all really helpful.

I like the idea of staining it....
oil wouldn't work though as we don't have it on hand and we need this in two days,
is there any other substance that we could use?

Aarons6890's rust idea is also pretty cool but how long would that take?

Watching that video is the best way (in my opinion) to accurately antique an acoustic guitar.

You could wear it in places and finish it with neutral, black, tan, or brown shoe polish. It'll give it a dirty sort of look. Believe it or not, shoe polish actually makes a good finisher for bare wood. Test it on a piece of wood to judge how you like the effect.
Sincerely, Chad.
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#10
Quote by superunknown
Thanks this is all really helpful.

I like the idea of staining it....
oil wouldn't work though as we don't have it on hand and we need this in two days,
is there any other substance that we could use?

Aarons6890's rust idea is also pretty cool but how long would that take?

i dont know how long it will take to rust, but i've seen soda seriously mess up some things. really acidic things should take some time over night, you put it in warm salt water.
#11
my acoustics seriously beat up i never did it intetionally i just never made sure i didnt scratch it or anything play it with really long pick sweeps on the body and just keep playing like that that would help
#12
Quote by 420 FREAK
my acoustics seriously beat up i never did it intetionally i just never made sure i didnt scratch it or anything play it with really long pick sweeps on the body and just keep playing like that that would help

He has two days. Try reading the thread before you post.
Sincerely, Chad.
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#13
Quote by Chad48309
He has two days. Try reading the thread before you post.

I did, I guess I didn't explain it right here just play the guitar like you dont care about scratching it up at all and like try to play some metal on it or something and scratch it all up with your pick (the bigger and thicker the better) 10 mins should do it.
#14
Quote by 420 FREAK
I did, I guess I didn't explain it right here just play the guitar like you dont care about scratching it up at all and like try to play some metal on it or something and scratch it all up with your pick (the bigger and thicker the better) 10 mins should do it.

Yeah, I'm sure that's a great idea if you want the guitar to look like someone dragged a pick across the body. That's not the same as wear and age; it's abuse, and it looks like **** in the relicing process.

Edit: Let's put this in perspective. Say you had a brass candlestick, and you wanted to antique it to match your decor or something. Would you either a) tarnish it and lightly polish it to make the corners and crevices have the look of age, b) tie it to your bumper and drag it down the road, or c) hit it with a hammer? A candlestick sits in a room and holds candles. Under no ordinary circumstances would it be smashed, dented, dinged, or marred. A guitar is the same way. The relicing process exists to simulate the eventual wear and age of a guitar. Not to look like it's been thrown around a parking lot. If you throw a guitar around a parking lot, it'll look the part. Relicing is a fine process in replicating the exact placement of wear in key areas. Ringing any bells, now?

Edit 2: And to sum up my point: there is no way on heaven or earth that playing a guitar "hard" for 10 minutes will give it the look of a guitar that has been played for 30, 40, or 50 years.
Sincerely, Chad.
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Last edited by Chad48309 at Mar 20, 2008,