#1
I've just started learning scales etc. I know for improv soloing, you basically just stick a scale and play around in it etc... obviously, we're not talking professional here.

So, say I'm jamming with a bunch of friends (in this example, lets assume they suck at guitar) and one goes into G-D-C or something the like. How do I know which scale to pick? Or Am-G-D-C... or any simple progression.... how do I pick a scale?
#2
pick the root note. if the song goes G-D-C, and then repeats, id go with G....isnt that the knockin on heavens door progression?
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#3
This?

Edit: While your at it check Part 5 aswell
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Last edited by victoryaloy at Mar 19, 2008,
#4
^^^ that'd be Em, the relative minor of the root
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#5
G-D-C = G Major

Am-G-D-C = A Dorian?
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#6
^^^
yep thats right.

I luld at ur sig
'08 Gretsch White Falcon
'98 Fender USA Deluxe Tele
'79 Greco Les Paul Standard
Airline Stratotone Crafter GAE8

A bunch of funky pedals

Handwired 50 Watt Plexi Lead Clone w/ Orange 4x12
#7
EDit i f'd up pretty good there nm my post um......

fell like an idiot anyways cary on
song stuck in my head today


Last edited by lbc_sublime at Mar 19, 2008,
#8
Quote by Dimebag Dave
G-D-C = G Major

Am-G-D-C = A Dorian?


Am-G-D-C = G major.

Modes will not be established unless played over vamps, or if the V chord is altered to be dominant, and pull to the tonic, while all the other chords suggest the modality.
#9
G D C sounds like G major, which is also E minor, and C Lydian as well.
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#10
Quote by Infatuation
G D C sounds like G major, which is also E minor, and C Lydian as well.


These are the notes of the C Lydian scale, yes, but as isaac_bandits said, you won't be playing in C Lydian unless determined by the chord progression (i.e. a maj7#11 chord).

Just because the notes belong to a certain mode doesn't mean it's correct to name it as such.
#11
Quote by :-D
These are the notes of the C Lydian scale, yes, but as isaac_bandits said, you won't be playing in C Lydian unless determined by the chord progression (i.e. a maj7#11 chord).

Just because the notes belong to a certain mode doesn't mean it's correct to name it as such.


Even a Lydian chord will usually establish itself as the sub dominant, unless it is a vamp, or the chord a fifth above it is dominant, in which case, it will only establish itself as a tonic chord for the Lydian mode, if all the chords aside from the dominant would fit in that mode, and the dominant is altered to be dominant.
#12
Quote by rageagainst64
pick the root note. if the song goes G-D-C, and then repeats, id go with G....isnt that the knockin on heavens door progression?


Yes it is... just throwing it out as an easy example.

So basically, G is going to be a dominant (sorry I know nothing about theory... gonna work on that soon) so if it is a simple major chord progression with G in there, G major will probably work?

Thanks a bunch guys... And yeah... The word lydian scares the crap out of me... it sounds confusing.
#13
Quote by ZanasCross
Yes it is... just throwing it out as an easy example.

So basically, G is going to be a dominant (sorry I know nothing about theory... gonna work on that soon) so if it is a simple major chord progression with G in there, G major will probably work?

Thanks a bunch guys... And yeah... The word lydian scares the crap out of me... it sounds confusing.


Not necessarily. A Gmaj triad is common in many keys, but will be the dominant V chord of C major. A G major scale could work, but not always. It is best to look at the whole progression, and see what to do