#1
How exactly do you build a rack setup?

You need a case, power amp, preamp, effects, etc, right?

And what do you use to hook it all together?
#2
You hook it up with cables.
Gear:
Ibanez RG550 20th RFR
Traynor YCV50
Fender FMT HH Tele
Mesa Boogie 2ch Triple Rectifier
2 1x12 custom Theile cabs
ISP Decimator
Krank Kranshaft
Boss BF-2 Flanger
BBE Sonic Maximizer
#3
anything you want.

Processors, tuners, noise gate, compressor, wireless systems and of course a power conditioner. cupholders.

most rackmount equipment are pretty expensive but cause they're good pieces of gear.
#4
Quote by kool98769
You hook it up with cables.

l
+1


but for effects look into the Rockman stuff it sounds very good.
Quote by gregs1020
Brett has been saving for a splawn for 4 years
countries have been toppled in the time it's taking, revolutions won got a black pres

yawn


Quote by bubb_tubbs
When he finally gets one it'll probably be televised like the Berlin Wall coming down.
The end of an era
#5
Okay, so I would buy an actual rack, then a power-amp, then a pre-amp, then effects, and it all uses 1/4 instrument cables in the back?

I would also need a power supply for all the rack equipment, correct?
#6
Quote by i_baked_cookies
Okay, so I would buy an actual rack, then a power-amp, then a pre-amp, then effects, and it all uses 1/4 instrument cables in the back?

I would also need a power supply for all the rack equipment, correct?

rack typically uses 1/4 or XLR. You dont actually need a rack (i think) if you're just going to be like, playing at home, but a rack case would definitely be needed if you ever went anywhere with your stuff.
And yes, you'll need a pre amp, and a power amp for sure, and then rack effects if you want. And it has to get powered somehow, doesnt it? Im not sure how, they probably have some type of plugin.
Gear:
Ibanez RG550 20th RFR
Traynor YCV50
Fender FMT HH Tele
Mesa Boogie 2ch Triple Rectifier
2 1x12 custom Theile cabs
ISP Decimator
Krank Kranshaft
Boss BF-2 Flanger
BBE Sonic Maximizer
#7
Quote by kool98769
rack typically uses 1/4 or XLR. You dont actually need a rack (i think) if you're just going to be like, playing at home, but a rack case would definitely be needed if you ever went anywhere with your stuff.
And yes, you'll need a pre amp, and a power amp for sure, and then rack effects if you want. And it has to get powered somehow, doesnt it? Im not sure how, they probably have some type of plugin.


Okay it makes more sense now... I wasn't planning on putting one together, I was just curious as to how it all worked.
#8
Racks are nice but also are a pain in this aspect... Theres usually always empty space's taunting you buy more stuff you dont need... And if you do fill it there will be another piece you will want and well you aint got enough room so your back to empty spaces again...


Other then that its pretty smooth as long as you get tube pre-amps and tube power-amps...
#9
Quote by i_baked_cookies
Okay, so I would buy an actual rack, then a power-amp, then a pre-amp, then effects, and it all uses 1/4 instrument cables in the back?

I would also need a power supply for all the rack equipment, correct?


Yeah you would need some kind of case/housing, depending on how many units you have. You can get cases with 2 slots, 4 slots etc.

You would need at the very least a Pre-amp and a Power Amp. The rest is up to you. You'd probably need some kind of midi controller floord board for it all too (so you can switch through effects)

My old setup (which was pretty damn amazing IMO) was:

Tech 21 PSA 1.1 (Amazing preamp)
TC Electronics G Major (delays/chorus/verbs etc)
A Yamaha Psomething Power amp
Into a 2x12 cab (celestion greebacks)
I also used a midi footpedal that allowed switching through patches a breeze. It all hooks up quite easily and worked well with the midi floorboard.

I also had a JD wah.

I've since switched rigs and am only using the Gmajor - I got a tube amp and am using various pedals for my gain stages now.
#10
Quote by i_baked_cookies
I would also need a power supply for all the rack equipment, correct?


Each rack piece has its own power source just like you find with amps.
#11
Racks are amazing. It's why I went that way, lol...

Basically, a rack is just a box you 'rack' your equipment it. What makes a rack special, is that *most* of the equipment is top-notch quality, and every piece is designed for a specialized function (amp, pre, effects, specific effect, etc.)

You don't "need" a rack to put your rack stuff in, but it would be highly recommended. And racks come in all sorts of sizes (given in "rack spaces"; each rack space is the size of your typical rack piece, which think is like 1.5" in height or such; some pieces are 2 rack units, 3 rack units, etc). Figure out what equipment you truly intend to have, and get a rack that can accommodate that amount of equipment. You don't want to buy too small, and always upgrade, cause the rack itself is a few hundred $ for a small one, to several hundred $$ and more!

Most rack equipment, as noted, runs on 1/4" cables (pretty much ALL pieces use this size as a default). Though some pieces of equipment offer other outputs/inputs in various other formats in addition to 1/4" (some offer MIDI, digital optical output, banana cables, etc). A downside of racks, is you will need A LOT of cables. Even a simple 3 to 4 piece rack is likely to have $100+ or more in cables.

For a basic guitar rack... the bare basics you need are a preamp (to color and form your tone), and a poweramp (to amplify the signal for your cab). Then you would hook it up to the cab. That's base minimum. Beyond that... you can add power supplies (rack mount items that have like 6 outlets in back, so you can plug in all your equipment)... tuners... effects processors (TC Electronics, Eventide, etc)... switch systems.... wireless systems... and much more! With a rack, you can hold several preamps with a single poweramp, offering multiple types of sounds easily... or a preamp with multiple poweramps, etc. There is a lot of flexibility to you.

Racks are worth the investment if you have the time to work with your setup, and you want a unique sound. You can combine all sorts of pieces... add items to your rack... remove items from your rack... and more. You really get to mold a unique and personal sound by pairing various preamps with different poweramps and different other rack units.

But racks also hold a downside... the biggest, it is COSTLY. Your typical quality rack-piece runs $1,000 to $2,000 or so. With your average rack being several units... you're looking at several thousand to build your 'desired rack'. You can do things cheaper of course, but ultimately your desires will be top-quality units. Another downside is that racks get HEAVY very fast... a simple rack will eventually be hundreds to several hundred pounds with power amps and other equipment loaded in... even though they are "portable"... you'll usually end up needing someone else to help you move it around (if you are gigging).

That's just some generalities...