#1
I may be purchasing a guitar half-stack amp in the future, and seeing as how I don't know too much about half-stacks/stacks, I'm just curious as to what the real differences are between these two styles of guitar cabs.


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#2
There really isn't much. Slant cabs have the top two speakers angled up a bit, so they project a bit more than straight cabs.
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#3
The top half of a slant cab is slanted back some so that the sound projects upwards slightly. This is usually ideal for half staks, because the upwards projection allows you to hear yourself better. Straight front cabs, however, are basically box shaped, and project the sound to the front more, which is ideal for full stacks when you wanna knock midgets over with your guitar playing.
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#4
The angled cabs project sound slightly up as well as straight ahead, thus filling out a room more than a straight cab. At the same time, there's less room in an angled cab thus they generally lack a bit of the thump that their straight counterparts can provide. Either way you'll be hard pressed to tell the difference most of the time.
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#5
Hmm, so basically.........


A Slant cab will/would be better for sound projection, and a Straight cab may be better if youre wanting a thicker sound?
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#6
Quote by Metalcoresoul
A Slant cab will/would be better for sound projection, and a Straight cab may be better if youre wanting a thicker sound?

Basically. However the superior projection of the slanted cab is far more noticeable than the slightly thicker sound of a straight cab.
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#7
Quote by Kendall
Basically. However the superior projection of the slanted cab is far more noticeable than the slightly thicker sound of a straight cab.



Which would explain why you don't see many people play through Straight cabs .
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#8
I used to always angle my Combo at 45 degrees to get a better sound. I guess this is why they built slanted cabs because they stole my awesome idea.
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#9
the only thing u can put on top of a slanted cab is a head, dont try and put another cab on top of a slanted cab, it WILL end in tears, sounds obvious, but theres always some retard out there.
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#10
Quote by Chex
I used to always angle my Combo at 45 degrees to get a better sound. I guess this is why they built slanted cabs because they stole my awesome idea.


That's probably it