#1
I know the Spider series isn't very popular around here, but are they really that bad?
I was in trying out a few things in te store today, through the Spider III 30w combo, and tbh for practise it sounded pretty good, alot better than my micro-cube.

I'm tempted to buyu one haha, keep in mind purely for practise...

Wat exactly is the problem with them?
#3
as a practice amp it's fine, but if you want to start gigging or are even looking at the bigger models you'd be better off with something else.
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Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#4
yeah they do sound decent in your room or whatever but i find even just jammin' with a drummer theres no presence...but to each his own i guess
#5
My problem with Spiders is that that, for as long as I had one, I could not find a get clean or distortion out of it. Which is pretty bad cuz I'm mostly an all metal guy. I couldn't get a good clean for like, the intro of One. Likewise, I couldn't get a good distortion out of it at all. Everything was so muddy, even with the bass turned all the way down, and I'm a guy who likes his bass.

I guess they're okay if you play like, really bad pop punk or really don't know jack about tone.. they are fairly loud for what they are.
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#6
Quote by sdmf.1919
I know the Spider series isn't very popular around here, but are they really that bad?
I was in trying out a few things in te store today, through the Spider III 30w combo, and tbh for practise it sounded pretty good, alot better than my micro-cube.

I'm tempted to buyu one haha, keep in mind purely for practise...

Wat exactly is the problem with them?



If it sounded good to you, then you should buy it and not heed to what others will tell you, it will all come down to personal preference and to the tone(s) youre wanting in an amp.


UG is the only guitar site I know that bashes the Spider III's as much as they do FWIW. But like I said, if it sounds good to you, then you should buy it. After all, we are not the ones buying the amp or spending the money are we?
Got a question about Baritone guitars? Feel free to PM me.

Thanks to UG, I converted from Metalcore to some "real" Metal.
#7
Well, I own a Vavleking head, but it's a bit loud for practising, and not great if I want to go anywhere else other than the room it's in lol.

But I dunno, both the metal and inside channels sounded pretty crisp to me.
#8
They are actually pretty nice to start will, but you'll out grow them pretty quickly. I'll be replacing mine pretty soon, but I don't regret owning it.
#10
marshalls are better, but line 6's are great for practise. if u decide to get one, i'll send u some settings. just send me a message on my profile
#12
TS- For practise they are fine, It will give you a more indept lesson of effects and what not. More so than the Microcube. But as said, when gigging you might thrive something much better.

Quote by mcrfobtai
They are just very digital sounding and don't sound like a good tube amp.

hence the whole SS thing...
#13
Ive got a Line6 head and i use that for practicing at home and also to record, it does the job i got it for. If i want 2 gig then ofcourse i break out the ol' H&K
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#14
It's simple and the answer is they DONT SUCK, theyre one of the best amps for the $$$ they dont dound digital either...
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#15
Quote by Metalcoresoul
If it sounded good to you, then you should buy it and not heed to what others will tell you, it will all come down to personal preference and to the tone(s) youre wanting in an amp.


UG is the only guitar site I know that bashes the Spider III's as much as they do FWIW. But like I said, if it sounds good to you, then you should buy it. After all, we are not the ones buying the amp or spending the money are we?


+1

Finally someone with some sense around here who tells things like they are.

Its all about personal preference. Everyone in the world may think it sounds like total crap but if you like it then thats all that matters! I mean most people on here would probably shun me for my set up (An Ashdown Fallen Angel stack with a DigiTech Death Metal in front of it) but I love it and thats all that matters to me.
#16
They're practice amps and nothing more. I tried gigging with one back in my n00b days.. and I turned it up to 10 and I couldn't hear it AT ALL. Of course, now that it's gone I couldn't care less. I do think Line 6 makes the best SS practice amps, but if you want a small amp get a VJ or a Blackheart or something.

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#17
One thing seems sure here: The Line 6 tends to polarize opinions a bunch.

I can understand this. I shopped long and hard for a half-stack, and listened to a whole lot of different sounds, while playing through a lot of different effects boxes. At the end of that, I bought the Line 6 Spider III HD150 half stack. But I will say that to my ear, it makes a sound unlike what any of the other modeling amps make. At high volumes (and 150 watts produces them, believe me) it's really not possible to get a clean sound out of it - the cleanest I can dial in still has some noticeable overdrive.

Nonetheless, it's nice to have all the presets, nice to have pretty damn good built-in flanger, phaser, tremolo, various delays and echos, overdrive, reverb, EQ, even a tuner. Nice to be able to plug in a CD player or even an electronic keyboard (this input bypasses the preamp, so use the volume and preamp at the source). Nice to be able to dial up the sound of my choice and store it away for instant access. Nice to plug in a jazz box and have it sound like a jazz box.

But again, it has a personality all its own, unlike anything else. You probably love it or hate it. I have never regretted this purchase even for an instant.
#18
The thing about spiders is this...

A new player with an underdeveloped ear might thing the spider
sounds great. As they get better they will outgrow it. The spiders
have alot of weaknesses. They dont give aggressive enough palm
mutes..they fizzle out when you hold a sustained note...And cleans
are just garbage. The Blues reverb is ok..

The money could be spend better elsewhere. The only thing you can do
with it..is sit a tiny tube amp on top of it and play them together through
stereo and use it for low end...

I ordered one..150 watter and i wasnt that happy with it...
shoulda went with a vox xl instead..
I bet Charlie Brown's teacher's name was Mrs.Hammett
#19
Quote by strings-N-stuff
*facepalm*

no MG


you have one.
what's with that?
Quote by atr5557
i just got the boss mt-2 metal zone pedal today. i got the adapter for it but how do i know if its charging?
#20
As a practice amp they arent to bad. My little peavey rage doesnt sound near as good as my tube amp. But it doesnt have to. Its just a small easy to move thing so I can hear myself is all. I have seen there are some reliability problems with spiders. How widespread it is dont know. But if you just want a little amp for your room with a bunch of features and it sounds good enough for you then no big deal. But as a 150 watt stack amp thats a whole different story.
#21
they are fine for practice but there are better options like the line 6 pod series (well, if you want to use headphones or have some decent speakers spare), Vox DA series, Vox Valvetronix (confusingly labeled "ADxxVT, don't get them mixed up with the little DA amps), Roland cube, or if you want a real tube amp for practice, there are numerous 5 watt tube amps such as the Epiphone Valve junior, Fender champion 600/Gretsch electromatic (these are the same thing), Ibanez Valbee, Blackheart little giant... etc etc etc.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#22
OP:

In the end, like I stated before, it is only going to matter how it sounds to you. Also, youre just buying it for a practice amp, youre not going to be taking it a 5000+ plus show or anything, thats what youre Valveking is for.


So like I said earlier, don't listen to what most of the people are telling you, because, in the end, your ear is the one who is going to judge how well it sounds, not ours. (and also, our pocketbook isnt going to be putting forth the money to purchasing it, the choice is up to you).


And just for the record, after messing and tweaking with my Spider III 75W for a while, I can get some nice and thick distortion with my Baritone through it.
Got a question about Baritone guitars? Feel free to PM me.

Thanks to UG, I converted from Metalcore to some "real" Metal.
#23
I like mine a lot. I find it hard to get a good clean sound when I don't use my Zoom effects pedal. If you add some chorus with that pedal, the cleans are actually really good. I really do like the sound of it, and I love how I can save my sounds and go back to them later. Plus, mine goes plenty loud enough. (Never had it past halfway)
#24
Quote by AngelOfHatred
I like mine a lot...Plus, mine goes plenty loud enough. (Never had it past halfway)


Yeah i agree totally. My 15w Spider III does the job for what I need it to do (bedroom practice.) The price is good and it sounds good to me so I got it.
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Quote by apak
My G string keeps slipping when i bend it.
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#25
Quote by b00m_
you have one.
what's with that?

actually I just sold it and buying a new tube head soon. I was gona take a baseball bat to it and put it on youtube, but it sold. thanks
Last edited by strings-N-stuff at Mar 21, 2008,