#1
I've just recently begun to learn theory and it seems as though once I think I have a section of it figured out, I don't. I'm not sure I'm right, but I believe C9 - or any chord for that matter - can pertain to different variations of the same notes. (Right? ) Assuming that's correct, C9, to my knowledge, would be 1 3 5 7b 9 on the C Major scale. So again, assuming this is right so far C9 would consist of (C E G Bb D). Using this information, I tried to make a visual aid showing this chord. So I began by drawing out a fret board and labeling each fret's note up to it's octave. Alright, this is where I get confused. According to my drawing, the 8th fret on the low E string is obviously C, so I assume I'd put a finger there. Next, I went to the A string and looked for E, which was on the 7th fret. Next G, which was 5th fret on the D string. Then Bb, which was 3rd fret on the G string. And finally, D, which was 3rd fret on the B string.

I know this is wrong, but my question is why? And how would I go about finding this chord through these steps. I looked online and one way showed:

E: 10 (4)
B: 8 (1)
G: 9 (2)
D: 8 (1)
A: 10 (3)
E: 8 (1)

*The number indicates the fret. The ( ) indicates the finger used.

I'm really new to theory and my curiosity is getting the best of me. I've checked the threads, but I find it easier to grasp when I can talk about it step by step.
#2
Quote by BChill
I know this is wrong, but my question is why?
It's not. That is one way to play a C9 chord. It's an exceptionally difficult way to play the chord and I suggest the voicing you posted, but it is a C9 chord.

If you want to play an easier version of the chord, play notes on frets that are closer together. Also, you don't have to play the fifth, G, so you can leave that note out if it makes things easier.


FYI, it is written b7, not b7.
#3
Im trying to understand, but they are placed in a specific order on the fretboard. You might be playing a note out of sequence from the C9 u've found. Its still a C9, just voiced differently. Like certain diminished chords.

I dont think i understand though.
#4
^You can play the notes in order. In fact, the root doesn't even have to be the lowest note. However, to make things easy, make C the lowest note, maybe G if you want to be daring.
#5
I guess my next question would be when a tab says to play C9, how do you know which variation it is?

Thanks for the quick responses.
#6
Quote by BChill
I guess my next question would be when a tab says to play C9, how do you know which variation it is?

Thanks for the quick responses.
The TAB should have the voicing written or there should be a chord diagram above the standard notation. If a sheet just says "C9," then you can play whichever voicing you want, but some may sound better than others and you will determine that by trial and error and experience.
#7
Quote by bangoodcharlote
The TAB should have the voicing written or there should be a chord diagram above the standard notation. If a sheet just says "C9," then you can play whichever voicing you want, but some may sound better than others and you will determine that by trial and error and experience.


Yeah, I was just making sure I wasn't supposed to know by looking at it if there was no chord reference. Sorry for all the questions - I printed a theory lesson out 2 days ago and I've spent most of my time learning the circle of fifths; just getting into chord construction - but I have a few more and I'm sure more will develop off of your responses. This is a bit overwhelming at the moment.

So can C9 be played anywhere on the frets as long as C E Bb and D are included and it still be considered a C9 chord? If this is correct, then how do you determine the root note by looking at a tab of the chord. For example, the 'Name that Chord' thread.

Also, how do you know what string to begin on?
Would this still be considered a C9?

E: 3 (4)
B: 1 (1)
G: 3 (3)
D: 0
A: x
E: x
#8
Quote by BChill
I guess my next question would be when a tab says to play C9, how do you know which variation it is?

Thanks for the quick responses.
It's also helpful to know the three or four most common forms. This is by far the most common Dominant9 chord from:

C9 (R379)
E-x-
G-3-
B-3-
D-2-
A-3-
E

You can also play fret 3 on the high E which would be the 5th.
EDIT:
Quote by BChill

Also, how do you know what string to begin on?
Would this still be considered a C9?
First off I wouldn't call it a C9 because you're missing the 3rd(but I'm guessing it might of been a typo?)

But as for what string to start on, usually it's a safe bet, especially when you're new to chord construction to start the chord on the root or the third. Though technically you can come up with any voicings, right now you want to establish the tonality of the chord which is usually done by root or 3rd in the base.

So I would say start you're voicing with the root anywhere on the top 3 strings.

And you're right, when constructing a Dom9 chord the 5th is the first to go. The second is the root - simply because bassists(or any other instrument) can play the root for you.
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Last edited by KryptNet at Mar 20, 2008,
#9
Quote by BChill
Would this still be considered a C9?

E: 3 (4)
B: 1 (1)
G: 3 (3)
D: 0
A: x
E: x
Replace that high G with the open E string and I would call that C9.

And don't go into the "Name that chord" thread to learn about basic chord naming. We try to make things vague and hard to figure out.