#1
Alright so I figured it'd be good to give some tips for beginners (Such as myself) so that we can all rock out together.

I know learning scales is good, but is there anything else that we could learn so that we can go crazy on a guitar?

#4
Learning scales on its own doesn't really help unless you know how to use them

I recommend listening to the pro's and examine how they use their scales. A common rock scale is the Minor Pentatonic. It's a relatively simple shape, and everyone uses it.

If you listen to a lot of great rock guitarists, you'll notice that they all use similar licks in their solos. Play those, mess around and try to discover more. Just playing up and down scales isn't gonna help.
#5
Learning techniques suchs as legato (hammer-ons, pull-offs and sliding), vibrato, palm muting are places to start. Scales are great for learning these, also search the interwebs for good excercises to help develope these techniques
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#6
In my opinion, don't worry about the theory right now. Just work on getting the basics down. To do that, just learn songs. Also, make wise song choices when you are a beginner. Don't try and waste your time with the usual songs that beginners try like Hangar 18, Master of Puppets or whatever. Just keep practicing and don't be intimidated.
Be cool.
#7
Quote by thedude051
In my opinion, don't worry about the theory right now. Just work on getting the basics down. To do that, just learn songs. Also, make wise song choices when you are a beginner. Don't try and waste your time with the usual songs that beginners try like Hangar 18, Master of Puppets or whatever. Just keep practicing and don't be intimidated.

What songs would you suggest?
I would consider myself intermediate....maybe.... I want something challenging but not frustratingly-hard

EDIT: btw is your lp-100 anygood? I was considering one
#8
Better to learn how to convey a song than how to "go crazy" on a guitar. I recommend the Beatles songbook. If you're interested in an LP, at least get a set neck one.
#10
Although it may seem like a bit of a chore, scales and techniques like legato and such are the way you're going to get better. As others have said, start learning some songs that include such things. For example, the intro for Whiskey in the Jar (by Thin Lizzy) makes use of pentatonic scales. And most of Angus Young's solos...but let's not go into that just yet. Just get some scales and the like in your arsenal and you'll be prepared to take on anyone.
#11
Timing. Get a metronome. I see so many guitarists who can rip but sound like hell because they get all off time and lost. Practice scales and chording with a metronome.

For rhythm , listen to percussionists. Some of the most amazing rhythm guitar lines are heavily influenced by percussion.


Chord progressions and be able to switch chording positions quickly. Too many use a bar chord in places that need full simply because they cannot manipulate their fingering in time. This in return makes it sound flat and lifeless...it works but it could be so much better.

Think outside the box....don't get trapped into straight line pentatonic runs. Learn how to connect scales. Learn to climb scales up single strings. Learn how to make your basic 2 octave scale and run it up the neck.

Modes. Learn more than Minor pentatonic, and blues scale. Lydian, Mixolydian, Phrygian, Aeolian, Locrian...etc. The more options you open to yourself the more flexible a player you can be.

Stretch, Stretch, stretch.....find exercises that will help you strengthen and stretch your fingers. My fingers are average size, but still feel a little short when trying to use new techniques at times. One exercise that helped me with stretching was a scale used by George Lynch called a Gothic octave. Google it.
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