#1
Alright, this ... well not exactly problem, has been around for ages. I know it's happened to all of us, and I was wondering if there was a cure. It occurs when you turn your bass amp pretty loud, and you get the "staticy" sound that is in the background of whatever is played...

How do you eliminate that?

I've played my Traben Phoenix 5-String, Soundgear 300 DX, and Dingwall Afterburner II through it millions of times, and I have yet to get it to disappear.

--Arojekt.
#2
All sorts of things can create static, especially if you have active pickups. A fan, a TV in the other room a computer in standby, a computer screen radios even lawnmowers over 50 feet away can make significant noise. So try some of those first. Then you could look into other things.
Do you use a BR-600?
If so, click here to join the group thats made for you!
#3
Yeah, they all have active pickups... what can be done to dampen or destroy the static altogether?

--Arojekt.
#4
Get a noise gate. They can come in rackmount or "stomp box" pedal form.

Depending on the quality of the noise gate, the better or worse it will be at eliminating the static.

Cheaper ways are - if you got single coil pups (like in Jazz Basses), make sure both pickups are on equal levels or equal blend. This will reduce some of the hum. Playing further away from electricals also helps.

Gear:
Fender Standard Jazz Bass
Artec Matrix Pedal Tuner
BBE Optostomp
Boss GEB 7
EHX NYC Big Muff
Ashdown MAG C410T-300
Torque T100BX
GAS-ing for:
Boss SYB5
Behringer Intelligate IG9
#5
If you have power wires running over each other at random angles and audio cables try making them running across your amps power cord at 90 degree angles. Same go's for anything else in your setup including the lead cord. I believe there are things that you can put in line on power sources but I'm still not sure if they have to go on the device that creates the electrical disturbance or in line with the amp. I also believe that the constant change in voltage coming out of power sockets can create some. Although that point I'm also not 100% sure on. Some sort of voltage regulator could help with that.
Do you use a BR-600?
If so, click here to join the group thats made for you!
#8
Quote by Jonnomainman
Get a noise gate. They can come in rackmount or "stomp box" pedal form.

Depending on the quality of the noise gate, the better or worse it will be at eliminating the static.

Cheaper ways are - if you got single coil pups (like in Jazz Basses), make sure both pickups are on equal levels or equal blend. This will reduce some of the hum. Playing further away from electricals also helps.


A noise gate will more than likely eliminate a large amount of the static, and you are definately right regarding the quality. If you buy some cheap thing it will probably make it worse. If the TS is annoyed that much, he should look into a higher end model.
Currently attempting to learn: The Dissentience by Protest The Hero in it's entirety.
#9
What about the Suppression system that Boss makes? I'm a big fan of Boss, especially with their distortion pedals on the electric guitar end... Is that a great one? It only runs for 70-80 bucks at GC and Sam Ash... so...

--Arojekt.