#1
Ok, I know the basic 5 scale forms of the Minor Pentatonic. I use the CAGED system so I understand how to connect the Minor Pent. Scales all the way down the fretboard, and when played in order correctly this allows me to play the same scale all the way down.

Now my question is this, say someone was to solo with the Minor Pent. form. Does a typical Minor Pent. solo include maybe 1 or 2 or 3 of these minor pent. forms, all connected? This would keep the player using the same exact key scale but allow them to play it in diff. positions.

Please advise, I really would like to know this.


CLIFFS:

- Minor Pentatonic Scale (5 diff. positions)

- Does a typical solo connect a few of these positions of the minor pent. scale?
#2
yea, most solo's connect the different posistions. Practise blending each position togethor smoothly. It really advances your soloing abilities to have access to the entire fretboard.
sigh...
#3
Sometimes yes sometimes no. Depends on the feeling the author wants really. Can keep it in one position and wank away at it all day or can move it around more expressively.
Do you use a BR-600?
If so, click here to join the group thats made for you!
#4
Yes there are particular solo's that connect all pentatonic positions. Paul Gilbert is a master at doing jus that!

The majority of good solos that use the Minor Pentatonic would use 4 positions. Starting on the 5th, moving to the 10th and hte 12th and then finally an octave up from the 5th on the 17th.
#5
Awesome, so I could play within the 5 minor pent. forms and use those as pretty much my guildlines.

Now, what if I was to use Minor Pent. at 3rd fret, then use the same form at the 5th fret. This would be out of key, correct?
#6
Yes but thats not to say you couldn't do it. Sometimes the laws of tradition must be disobeyed.
Do you use a BR-600?
If so, click here to join the group thats made for you!
#7
Quote by Mettliccaa
Yes but thats not to say you couldn't do it. Sometimes the laws of tradition must be disobeyed.



Damn staight baby! Shake it up!!!
#8
All scales cover the entire fretboard. Play the notes wherever you want, in any order you want.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
Yes sometimes the technicalities can kill you...
Do you use a BR-600?
If so, click here to join the group thats made for you!
#11
Well technically speaking, do what Archeo said, play the notes in any order and in any fashion. Don't be too preoccupied with the "correct" way to play a scale or a solo. The best thing for to do is jam and come up with your own scale patterns and runs. That way, you learn all the positions through natural means and you also create your own style in process.
#12
Quote by CousticStrangla
I know I can go "out of the box," but technically speaking. . . .


You asked whether or not you could branch out beyond the first position "box shape". Scales are collections of notes, not box shapes.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#13
The sooner you stop thinking about positions the better.

You can use the notes of the scale anywhere you want, all the boxes are is a quick visual guide as to where the notes fall, they're not a guide as to what you should play. Pay more attention to the sounds that are coming out of your guitar, not where your fingers are.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com