Poll: Should I join a ban w/out perfect pitch?
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View poll results: Should I join a ban w/out perfect pitch?
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21 88%
No
3 13%
Voters: 24.
#1
Well, I've been playing for about 4 years now (I'm 15) and I really want to get a band ASAP. The problem is, I don't have anywhere near perfect pitch. I don't know if i shoud join a band 'cause I don't want to have the bass player play something and I say "Ok thats cool...what key is that in?"

So my question to you is - Should I join a band with an untrained ear?
If ur ears aint ringin...ur doin it wrong

Last edited by guitarist10 at Mar 21, 2008,
#2
Ear training is important, but it won't get you perfect pitch.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
you should. my ex-guitar tech/teacher told me
the best way to learn theory and pitch is by
forming a band.

=]
#5
Quote by reaper_x
you should. my ex-guitar tech/teacher told me
the best way to learn theory and pitch is by
forming a band.

=]


Wow didn't know that! Thanks m8
If ur ears aint ringin...ur doin it wrong

#6
Well if you've been playing for 4 years you should have some ear training. If you can solo over chords, then you can be in a band.
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#8
Quote by guitarist10
I don't know if i shoud join a band 'cause I don't want to have the bass player play something and I say "Ok thats cool...what key is that in?"


I don't really see why that should be an issue. Lots of people have trouble asking questions when they're first forming band because they feel it might make them look stupid. It's better to ask the question rather than fishing around for the key.

The bass player in my band has an untrained ear and knows minimal theory. It works just fine for us because when he makes up riffs, that's great, I can play around what he's playing. When I make up riffs I can tell him what to play and he'll play around with it and expand on it. And I can just help him out if he's going wrong with it.

You should still be working on ear training though. Learning songs by ear is a great way to get relative pitch, you just need to start working out simple riffs/progressions/melodies and build it up from there. Also, work on recognising intervals. I think the octave, perfect 5th and perfect 4th are the best place to start, and then move onto other intervals when you have those ones down.

So to answer your question, yes, you can join a band with an untrained ear. Like someone said before me, joining a band will probably help train your ear.
#9
If you're in a band you will learn things soooooo damn much faster!
after some practice you can even get that perfect pitch...
#10
Quote by guitarist10
Well, I've been playing for about 4 years now (I'm 15) and I really want to get a band ASAP. The problem is, I don't have anywhere near perfect pitch. I don't know if i shoud join a band 'cause I don't want to have the bass player play something and I say "Ok thats cool...what key is that in?"

So my question to you is - Should I join a band with an untrained ear?


That was like me, but being in a band really does push you to train your ear. It helps a lot.
#11
Quote by guitarist10
I don't want to have the bass player play something and I say "Ok thats cool...what key is that in?"


Most people know what key they are in by seeing where there hands are. Most people do NOT have perfect pitch, and, even without good relative pitch it is fairly easy to learn how to tell what key you are in.
#12
Perfect pitch can be learnt but it does take years to get down
But aural skills practice is definately good, guitar and keyboards can be a good starting point for you to get reference notes off, and a good thing to do is to sing (or if you cant get the octave, harmonise it) and learn how to do that; it helps alot in being able to melodise and follow other musicians
#13
Work on developing your sense of relative pitch...

This is much more important than developing your perfect pitch.

You absolutely do not have to wait to get perfect pitch to start a band. It's totally ok to ask the bass player what key something is in. That's what being in a band is about. You work together.
#14
perfect pitch has nothing to do with figuring out what key something is in. You have a guitar in front of you; it's not all too hard to work out what notes a bassist is playing. What you do need is a general understanding of what sorts of shapes scales take on the fretboard and what notes are contained in scales (memorize the circle of fifths and learn how to use it) so that you can for example, see that youre playing a G# a C# and an F# and surmize that it is in A major...

but honestly youre only 15, just join a band and fiddle around and experiment. And you can always ask someone what key theyre in, it's not like they won't respect you because you couldnt tell that something was in E major just by listening to it. Relatively few people have perfect pitch in the grand scheme of things and it honestly isnt all that useful. I know people who can tell you that a certain blocks of wood emit the tones of A and F# when you smack them together, but it doesn't help them create music that's superior to someone with only relative pitch.
#15
Quote by InsomniaRocks
perfect pitch has nothing to do with figuring out what key something is in.


I think what they were getting at was working out what key something is in purely by ear, in which case, perfect pitch has everything to do with that.
#16
lol, most people don't have perfect pitch. What you generally get is good relative pitch. A good part of the reason you may not have much of an ear is BECAUSE you haven't jammed with other people enough. It's, IMO, the best way to train your ear.