#1
Well it's been asked a million times before but I kind of needed my own personal responses for this question. I'm not terrible at guitar, and I was just wondering if I should go back to the basics and learn a few things i skipped over. I play almost every style, from Zeppelin to Necrophagist. I personally alternate pick on almost everything. Should I hammer on/pull off on my scales? I alternate pick notes that are on the same string when i sweep pick also, is it easier to learn to hammer on and pull off?

I had this thought while learning BTBAM's Alaska.

Sorry for the n00bish and overly popular question.
#2
Its not one or the other, those are both fundametal techniques, you need to know them.
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#3
Well I know that, and I do know both. I just don't know what would be easier in the long run, and I have a hard time knowing when to use which. Should I go back and learn to use hammer ons as a part of my basic scaling or should i just learn to use them when absolutely necessary?
#4
I'm having a hard time trying to process this one...are you using one over the other? I don't even know, these are both techniques that just come naturaly to me. I'm not sure if I don't have an answer or if I just don't understand the question...
#5
Well, lets say your'e playing a standard E Minor scale up the fretboard starting on the 12th fret of the low E. Do you hammer on each note and only pick each string or do you pick each note individually? Would you do the same for a pentatonic minor? What about consecutive notes on the same string while sweep picking?
#6
You use a hammer on / pull off when you want to achieve the smoothest possible transition from one note to the next (in terms of sound).
#7
Quote by 6_6_6_1_syn
Well, lets say your'e playing a standard E Minor scale up the fretboard starting on the 12th fret of the low E. Do you hammer on each note and only pick each string or do you pick each note individually? Would you do the same for a pentatonic minor? What about consecutive notes on the same string while sweep picking?


Get your hammer ons and alternates to sound as close as possible to each other and it won't matter which one you use .
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#8
Quote by 6_6_6_1_syn
Well, lets say your'e playing a standard E Minor scale up the fretboard starting on the 12th fret of the low E. Do you hammer on each note and only pick each string or do you pick each note individually? Would you do the same for a pentatonic minor? What about consecutive notes on the same string while sweep picking?


If you're practicing scales as picking exercises then pick them, if your practicing them as hammer-on exercises then use hammer ons - it's that simple. There's no such thing as "basic scaling", scales are a musical tool for composition and to help you understand music.

Now, the patterns that you can form from scales do make handy exercises, but don't spend too much time playing up and down them - guitarists who practice going up and down scales all the time get good at going up and down scales, that's all. If you want to incorporate scales into you practice routine the best way is to use some horicontal patterns that move the scale along the fretboard, that way you're practicing runs that will actually be useful to you.

If you're PLAYING then do whatever you feel like...except run up and down the scale
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#9
Quote by 6_6_6_1_syn
Well, lets say your'e playing a standard E Minor scale up the fretboard starting on the 12th fret of the low E. Do you hammer on each note and only pick each string or do you pick each note individually? Would you do the same for a pentatonic minor? What about consecutive notes on the same string while sweep picking?


It's not one or the other. Hammering on will give a different sound than picking, so it's personal preference when your improvising with a scale. You shouldn't concentrate on only hammering on or only alt picking through a scale. You need to be able to do both.

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#10
i believe alternate picking is the one thing people skip over the most when they first start. stick with the picking
#11
They both have their uses and both need to be considered. Sometimes the musical statement you're trying to make will better benefit from alternate picking, sometimes it will benefit from hammer-ons and pull-offs. Consider the musical statement you're trying to make and then try to make a decision. Personally I tend to alternate pick when I'm playing lower notes or with heavy distortion in order to get a little more bite.

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