#1
so i wanna compose this jazz song but need some common jazz chord progression...
like iim7 to im9 etc...or something....
#2
The standard jazz progression is ii-V-i, but this often elaborated on and expanded into several keys. Jazz is not something you can pick up in a few days. Read the theory sticky and become familiar with chord and scale construction, and diatonic harmony. Jazz is one of the most theoretically complex genres out there.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
Just doing a II-V-I would probably do the trick if you're new to jazz something like this:

Em7 - A7 - Dmaj7 - Dmaj7
Dm7 - G7 - Cmaj7 - Cmaj7
Cm7 - F7 - Bbmaj7 - Bbmaj7
Bdim - E7 - Am7 - E9-B7

One bar for each chord, except the last two (E9-B7), both in one bar.
The last two chords are a turnaround so you can get back to Em7.
#4
The V --> I movement (or cadence) is at the heart of jazz. The ii7 -> V7 -> Imaj7
is the most prototypical jazz progression. If you thoroughly understand that
single, simple progression you'll understand a huge chunk of jazz. It doesn't
need to be any more complicated than that to get into jazz.
#5
Yup, ii-V-I. But I say you can go farther then the progression and write an entire head and really get that brain firing. It's surprisingly simple in it's form and yet offers room for so much creative complexity. Some starting out pointers:
1-Write a super-simple melody using 32bar form and phrasing AABA or ABAC(that's going to be your foundation for chord harmony!)
2-Change chords on the 1st and 3rd beat of each measure(2 chords per measure)
3-Use the ii-V over most measures and try to shift tonality ever 2 measures or so(keep it interesting...sustain tension)
4-Always resolve to I of the original tonality(first measure) at a cadence(usually at measure 8) and keep that I chord going for the entire measure for concrete resolution.

Hopefully that wasn't confusing. But writing a simple/standard jazz song is fun and excellent for your brain.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#6
Before you attempt to write a jazz tune, you have to know what jazz sounds like. Do you?

Listen, listen, listen first. Then worry about the nuts and bolts.
#7
^^Absolutely. I apologize to the TS if I was getting a head of myself. No pun intended. I've just taken up writing jazz songs and I'm all excited about it.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#8
I was addressing the TS if there was any confusion (can't tell)

Your input was fine & good luck with your musical endeavours.
#9
Quote by Nick_
I was addressing the TS if there was any confusion (can't tell)

Your input was fine & good luck with your musical endeavours.
Oh no, I understood. I just read over my post and thought it might of been too much for someone(the TS) asking simply about what progressions are used.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination