#1
1) Is E# = F or Fb?

2) With power chords, eg A5, B5, C5, do you always have to double the root or can you double the 5th note? And also can you just have one root note and one 5th note?

3) With sus chords, eg Csus2 or Csus4, can you suspend the 3rd note for something other than the 2nd or 4th?

Thanks
#2
E# = F Fb = E

don't need a double root

Yes

AND I am sorry I don't no much about sus chords
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#3
1)Well you tell me...if you sharpen an E what do land on?
2)yeh a power chord is just the root and 5th and you can have either as many times as you want (i particularly like to double the 5th an octave below and have it in the bass, very heavy)
3)well if you suspend it for the root, it makes a power chord, suspend for 5th and you have a power chord. and for anything above that it is sorta implied anyway whether it is major or minor or major by the complexity of the chord and by the amount of notes from the sacle that are actually used. but you just add no 3rd in the chord name and yeh i wouldnt worry about it too much just go for what sounds nice and mess around and come to the whole naming thing later on =P (it is also sometimes nice to have broken chords with suspended notes and create a nice harmony by using melody in a nice way say using the third in the melody instead of the chord, experiment).
#7
Quote by iBillyTheKid
Is there such thing as Csus13? Or anything above sus6?
No. You use the lower octave (6=13, 4=11, 2=9). You only use the higher octave when you're adding extensions to 7th or maj7th chords.
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
No. You use the lower octave (6=13, 4=11, 2=9). You only use the higher octave when you're adding extensions to 7th or maj7th chords.


Couldn't one add extensions to °7 chord as well?
#9
Quote by isaac_bandits
Couldn't one add extensions to °7 chord as well?
I suppose.

Let's just say you use the higher octave if the chord has a seventh and a third of some kind.