#1
hey there i just started learning some theory!!!and i have some questiona
for example slither by velvet revolver in the beginning goes D>C>G so if i wanted to improv in the solo i could use the D minor pentatonic right???and the key of the song should be in D minor?????

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vewm5l-i-yw
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#2
Quote by l0rdpt
hey there i just started learning some theory!!!and i have some questiona
for example slither by velvet revolver in the beginning goes D>C>G so if i wanted to improv in the solo i could use the D minor pentatonic right???and the key of the song should be in D minor?????

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vewm5l-i-yw


No. D-C-G represents a IV-V-I progression in the key of G. Use the G major or G major pentatonic scale. As you seem to have minimal theoretical knowledge, I would advise you to use G major pentatonic for know, as G major adds two "avoid notes", which are more difficult to use than the five notes of the pentatonic. However, as you progress, these notes will become very useful, as they can add dissonance, which will allow you to be more expressive.
#3
^You don't know the song. "Slither" is definately in D minor.

D5 C5 G5 can be used as either a 5 4 1 progression in G or a 1 b7 4 progression in D. Use your ear to determine which it is.
#4
Quote by bangoodcharlote
^You don't know the song. "Slither" is definately in D minor.

D5 C5 G5 can be used as either a 5 4 1 progression in G or a 1 b7 4 progression in D. Use your ear to determine which it is.


Ahh, my bad. You are right I do not know the song. I made the assumption that he meant Dmajor - Cmajor - Gmajor, which would definitely establish a G major tonality. However, as I did not know he was referring to D5 - C5 - G5, I stand corrected.
#5
Quote by isaac_bandits
Ahh, my bad. You are right I do not know the song. I made the assumption that he meant Dmajor - Cmajor - Gmajor, which would definitely establish a G major tonality. However, as I did not know he was referring to D5 - C5 - G5, I stand corrected.
You can use Dmajor - Cmajor - Gmajor to establish a bluesy/rock D major song, something where you would play the D minor pentatonic. The intro to "Shine" by Collective Soul is a good example of this.
#6
Quote by bangoodcharlote
You can use Dmajor - Cmajor - Gmajor to establish a bluesy/rock D major song, something where you would play the D minor pentatonic. The intro to "Shine" by Collective Soul is a good example of this.


Ahh. The damn blues, going against classical theory !