#1
I've been using an Ibanez RG1527 Prestige for a little over a year now and have been having some major problems with the spring and string tensions. I broke my high E-string about a week ago, the day before a show, so I bought a new pack of strings the next day and replaced the single string as I didn't have time to worry about tuning issues of all new strings before I played. I started actually tuning when I got to the venue, and that's when my problem began. At first it seemed that all the strings were more or less in tune (I drop the 7th string from B to A), until I got to the high E string. I really don't use my highest string that much in my music, but as with any floating bridges, if a single string is missing, all the strings' tunings go to hell. As I tightened up my new high E string, I had to repeatedly "cycle" through all of the strings, as they kept going flat. After literally fifteen minutes of "cycling", I noticed that my bridge looked as if it were going to "topple" over on to my pickups; that's how much I was tightening my strings, yet I was still flat! I've never changed my springs, or string gauge. This inconsistency with my guitar has been a huge hassle. Now I plan to block my bridge completely, as I don't really use the whammy bar much, but before I do that I need to some how fix the tension, etc. Any ideas? Thanks in advance.

TL;DR : My floating bridge is approaching a 75° incline from being "flush" with my guitar, yet I'm still flat. HELP!
#3
^it's an edge pro, just so you know. Oh, and the list goes:
1. Remove Edge III
2. Drop in 7 string OFR
3. ???
4. Profit!
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#4
Quote by vivalasoad883
1. Remove Edge 3
2. Drop in 7 string OFR
3. Win!


Lol, fail much? 7 string edge pro in my opinion is better than a 7 string OFR.

About the actually problem. One thing i can think of is maybe on of the strings has come loose? If not just tighten the springs until you get it right. Did you accidentally but a higher gauge string set? By all means if you bought the same gauge then it shouldnt be doing that.
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#5
Okay I think I know what happened. I usually buy D'Addario Regular Light 7-string packs which go from 10-59. When I snapped my high E I noticed I had a full pack lying around so I decided to replace all the strings. As soon as I locked the new high E, the ball end snapped. I have no idea, seemed like a string defect. Anyway, the next day I went to my music store and just bought a single ELEVEN gauge high E. It was accident, I thought I needed 11 and not 10, but I had no idea it would make such a difference. And about the bridge, I plan to block it. The only reason I have a floating tremolo is because Ibanez doesn't offer prestige models with hardtail bridges, or atleast did not at the time. Thanks guys.

Btw hopefully I'll follow the following instructions:

1. Exchange 10 gauge for 11 gauge high E
2. Tune normally, with the bridge FLUSH for once
3. Block trem
4. ????
5. PROFIT!!!
#6
Maybe one of the trem springs came loose? or...

...your replacement string is of a higher guage or density than what was previously on the guitar.
Even if the packaging said the specs were the same, there was obviously an error, perhaps a .010 slipped in with the .009s and you got the goose.
Try another string and make sure the gauge is the same as your original posted one.

Ibanez uses D'Addario strings (well in "99 and '00 they did) .009-.042, .056 lowB,
for their electric guitars.
There is always a chance your bass player tweaked the trem springs in the back while you weren't looking

problem solved

Cheers!
Noob to UG, not guitar
SuperSaijin 4 Guitar
#7
Quote by PerryS.
Okay I think I know what happened. I usually buy D'Addario Regular Light 7-string packs which go from 10-59. When I snapped my high E I noticed I had a full pack lying around so I decided to replace all the strings. As soon as I locked the new high E, the ball end snapped. I have no idea, seemed like a string defect. Anyway, the next day I went to my music store and just bought a single ELEVEN gauge high E. It was accident, I thought I needed 11 and not 10, but I had no idea it would make such a difference. And about the bridge, I plan to block it. The only reason I have a floating tremolo is because Ibanez doesn't offer prestige models with hardtail bridges, or atleast did not at the time. Thanks guys.

Btw hopefully I'll follow the following instructions:

1. Exchange 10 gauge for 11 gauge high E
2. Tune normally, with the bridge FLUSH for once
3. Block trem
4. ????
5. PROFIT!!!


Well, surprising as it may be, a single string with a wrong gauge can unbalance the bridge.

Now, I'm not completely sure I follow the story, but I think it went like this:

-the trem was balanced for a set of 10's.

-you put on a new set of 10's

-you snapped the high E (you can actually send it back in most cases, resulting in you recieving a free replacement)

-you replaced the 10 with an 11

-the trem is unbalanced


Am I on the right track?

Anyway, if this is the case, just switch the 11 for a 10 again and you should be fine.


One tiny point though, which has nothing to do with your guitar, but Ibanez have the PGM301, the MBM1, the MTM1, The JS1600, the RGA series, the FR series and the AR300RE in their current line up which are all hardtails and Prestige.

Granted, non of those are seven strings.

I guess the Apex II and the Xiphos 7 come closest to what you want (at least on paper).


Quote by vivalasoad883
1. Remove Edge 3
2. Drop in 7 string OFR
3. Win!



As pointed out, not every Ibanez comes with an Edge III.

On top of that, this seems like a tension problem, which has nothing to do with the quality of the trem.
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
#8
Dude, i had this exact same thing happen to me with my XPT700 Xiphos. The screws in the back behind the bridge that prevent the bridge from warping under tension from the strings are loose. Flip your guitar and open the compartment in the back (make sure you tuned all your stings low so they don't snap when the bridge goes back up). In there you'll find springs and and screws that fasten the bridge so it doesnt tilit up. Tighten these (they were stripped for me) and retune your guitar. It shouldn't rise back up. If the screws have been stripped you need to replace them with exactly the same type. I advice seeing a specialist for that.

THIS HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THE STRINGS...
"I'll bite into your face just to be close to your eyes"
Last edited by Apathium at Mar 22, 2008,
#9
Quote by Apathium
Dude, i had this exact same thing happen to me. The screws in the back behind the bridge that prevent the bridge from warping under tension from the strings are loose. Flip your guitar and open the compartment in the back (make sure you tuned all your stings low so they don't snap when the bridge goes back up). In there you'll find springs and and screws that fasten the bridge so it doesnt tilit up. Tighten these (they were stripped for me) and retune your guitar. It shouldn't rise back up. If the screws have been stripped you need to replace them with exactly the same type. I advice seeing a specialist for that.



The problem with adjusting the bridge right now, is that as soon as you go back to a 10 on the high E again, you're going to have to adjust it back to the way it was.


Unless you want to keep playing with 11's on the high E string, don't adjust the bridge.

Quote by Apathium


THIS HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THE STRINGS...


It does.

The point of the springs is countering string tension. If the string tension changes (by using a different gauge or tuning for instance), the bridge becomes unbalanced.

In your case, the 11 used instead of a 10 made the string tension higher than the soring tension, causing the bridge to rise.

As I said above, if you adjust for this change in tension, youé going to have to adjust the bridge again when you put a 10 back on.
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
Last edited by Bonsaischaap at Mar 22, 2008,
#10
Quote by Bonsaischaap
The problem with adjusting the bridge right now, is that as soon as you go back to a 10 on the high E again, you're going to have to adjust it back to the way it was.


Unless you want to keep playing with 11's on the high E string, don't adjust the bridge.



No matter what gauge you use it's going to continue tiliting.
"I'll bite into your face just to be close to your eyes"
#11
Quote by Apathium
No matter what gauge you use it's going to continue tiliting.



Do you have any idea how a floating bridge works?
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
#12
Quote by Bonsaischaap
Do you have any idea how a floating bridge works?

Yes, i see your point, but all i'm saying was when this same problem happened to me, the gauge did not change a thing.
"I'll bite into your face just to be close to your eyes"
#13
Quote by Apathium
Yes, i see your point, but all i'm saying was when this same problem happened to me, the gauge did not change a thing.



Well, if I get your story, the threads on the screws holding the springs in your guitar were stripped, resulting in them not staying in place.


Of course if your screws are slipping out , then yes, the bridge would go up, regardless of the gauge.




However, this isn't the only cause for a raised bridge and given that he just went up in gauge on one of his strings, that seems like the most obvious answer.
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
#14
Increase the spring tension with the screws in the back.
"Acoustic Guitars are totally lame and not metal"- Nathan Explosion
#15
Quote by Apathium
Yes, i see your point, but all i'm saying was when this same problem happened to me, the gauge did not change a thing.



It will help to get the original gauge in all the strings. Tuning two sets of strings--one thicker; the other one thinner--the same means you have to have more tension in the thicker gauge. Being thicker means they naturally have a lower tone, so you have to overtighten them to reach the pitch you are aiming for. And that, my friends, means the springs are not tight enough to balance the string tension and keep the bridge parallelling the face of the guitar.

Be sure you have the original string gauge on all your strings and that your springs are not worn out or strained; put new springs in if the old ones are fugged up.

#16
Quote by Chorduroy
It will help to get the original gauge in all the strings. Tuning two sets of strings--one thicker; the other one thinner--the same means you have to have more tension in the thicker gauge. Being thicker means they naturally have a lower tone, so you have to overtighten them to reach the pitch you are aiming for. And that, my friends, means the springs are not tight enough to balance the string tension and keep the bridge parallelling the face of the guitar.

Be sure you have the original string gauge on all your strings and that your springs are not worn out or strained; put new springs in if the old ones are fugged up.



I reckon that he fixed it, seeing as this thread is nearly 9 months old...
You've read it, you can't un-read it!