#1
My friend confused the hell out of me because he learned diatonic scales around the same time I learned the modes and then he told me that it's easier to just learn the diatonic scales because they contain the modes.

wtf mate?

Help?
#2
Each mode is built off a degree of a scale, start with the major scale for example. Based on the degree you have different modes because each mode contains the same notes as the parent major scale with a different root. In C major:

C Ionian
D Dorian
E Phrygian
F Lydian
G Mixolydian
A Aeolian
B Locrian

Read the theory sticky up top for more; in addition, make sure you fully understand diatonic harmony first, it's less limiting and more harmonically stable.
#3
I understand the modes... It's the whole diatonic thing that doesn't work for me... Can you define diatonic for me?
#5
Oh ok. Thanks. I was mixing it up with something else. That helps a ton...
#7
Quote by :-D
It's a seven note (heptatonic) scale comprising five whole step intervals and two half step intervals.


AND it must have the half steps spaced approximately evenly.

This means that there must be two whole tones one directions, and three whole tones in the other direction from the semitones.

This means that the seven diatonic scales can be derived as modes of the major scale, but it is better to think of them as scales, and completely independent from the major scale.

Some people argue that the harmonic minor and melodic minor (as well as their relative scales) should also count as diatonic scales, but this is debatable.
#8
Quote by isaac_bandits
AND it must have the half steps spaced approximately evenly.

This means that there must be two whole tones one directions, and three whole tones in the other direction from the semitones.

This means that the seven diatonic scales can be derived as modes of the major scale, but it is better to think of them as scales, and completely independent from the major scale.

Some people argue that the harmonic minor and melodic minor (as well as their relative scales) should also count as diatonic scales, but this is debatable.


Yes, and I've also looked at this spacing as a system in which the half step intervals are separated as much as possible.

I've even seen some people argue that the natural minor is not a diatonic scale, but I have no idea why.
Last edited by :-D at Mar 22, 2008,
#9
Your friend is thinking of scales as patterns, not collections of notes. Learn the major and minor scales VERY well first, but then learn how to apply modes (you will already know their fingerings since the fingerings are the same as their parent scales).