#1

I guess I dived into the world of guitar playing songs, riffs and chords without actually looking at the scales. So I've realized how important they are and I'm referring to really useful sites so I can learn all my scales. I have a question about them though.
I'm referring to this site: http://www.zentao.com/guitar/theory/major-scale.html
Now, scroll down and it tells you the w/h rule to these major scales. But scroll even further down to "The Fingerboard" section. Why aren't those using the WWHWWWH rule? And why is it that if we're playing C Major, and C is the root note, it doesn't start on C?
#2
Its best to look at scales when playing songs, Thats what I Do with my Tabs, Except for one which didn't relate to any scale. You could learn 1 milllion riffs, But you need thery about the riff. Good Stuff.

If you look at the C Diagram, You will see there are 2 Squares, They are the C Octaves. But, I don't know why It doesn't start on C.
#3
It's just showing you all the notes in the key of C major on each string; for example, the first diagram is on the high E string, so the first fret will be the F. It's not meant to be the scale, but rather it outlines the notes of the scale across each string.
#4
Quote by Martin259
Its best to look at scales when playing songs, Thats what I Do with my Tabs, Except for one which didn't relate to any scale. You could learn 1 milllion riffs, But you need thery about the riff. Good Stuff.

If you look at the C Diagram, You will see there are 2 Squares, They are the C Octaves. But, I don't know why It doesn't start on C.


If they're power chords, can you still relate?
#6
Oh, sorry about that. Well when you said that you look at the scales when playing your songs, are you just looking at the solos? I'm trying to teach myself how to do that, but I don't know if you're looking at the solos or the whole song.
Does that make sense? Ugh sorry.
#7
Quote by funkyspunk
Oh, sorry about that. Well when you said that you look at the scales when playing your songs, are you just looking at the solos? I'm trying to teach myself how to do that, but I don't know if you're looking at the solos or the whole song.
Does that make sense? Ugh sorry.


The whole song will be based around a specific scale (one scale in this case for simplicity's sake) because you'll be in one key. The notes you play for the riffs and solo will be within the C major scale. Your progression might look like:

C5: Notes C, G
G5: Notes G, D
F5: Notes F, C
G5: Notes G, D again

All of those notes can be found naturally occurring in the C major scale, and your solo would utilize the same scale. Does that make sense?
#8
Alright, I'm grasping it. Thanks so much for your patience. While I'm at it, I'd like to ask one more question. Take this site for examply, recommended to me by someone http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php?qqq=1&scch=C&scchnam=Major&get2=Get and make it Pattern: 1 Chord: C Scales: Major.
It's supposed to show you the scale, isn't it? So why doesn't it start on C? If I learn that scale, would it still be right?
#9
Yes, it's still a C major scale: the C major scale contains the notes C, D, E, F, G, A, B no matter what order you play the notes in. That pattern still contains those notes, so it will be the C major scale. I would tell you to look into modes of the major scale, but seein as you're a beginner, honestly do not concern yourself with them.

Learning the WWHWWWH formula for major scales is helpful, which I see you've done; you will be able to make sense of how major scales, and subsequently major chords, are constucted.
#10
Alright, so if I take that site and learn it, and just say I show it to someone professional, they'll know it as the C Major scale? They won't tell me off because I didn't start on the root note, C?
Would looking into the modes of major scales be important? Should I concern myself with it after I've learnt my theory?
#11
Quote by funkyspunk
Alright, so if I take that site and learn it, and just say I show it to someone professional, they'll know it as the C Major scale? They won't tell me off because I didn't start on the root note, C?
Would looking into the modes of major scales be important? Should I concern myself with it after I've learnt my theory?


If you're playing for an evaluation or something, I'd personally begin on the root note; but the patterns that are not starting on C are still ways to play the C major scale because they contain the notes of the C major scale. Make sure you don't learn the scale simply as patterns though; learn the notes (and the intervals that comprise a major scale) so you can apply scales over the entire fretboard.

Looking into modes would be very confusing at this point in your music theory career; after you have a full understanding of basics like scales, chords, progressions and keys you can take a look at them to expand your knowledge.
#12
Man, thanks so much for putting up with these questions and still be such a friendly person!
#13
Quote by funkyspunk
Man, thanks so much for putting up with these questions and still be such a friendly person!


No problem, my username isn't a happy smiling face for nothing.

If you have other questions feel free to ask.
#14
Alright. Would you mind if I Personal Messaged you if I had any other questions about this type of stuff? Or would that be too much of an annoyance?
Well then, I hope you never stop smiling!