#1
Man I feel like a n00b for posting this...

I was was thinking about incorporating a major scale OR it's relative minor (as I have yet to learn the boxes for the minor scale) into my playing and I was wondering if there were any musicians who do this. I am actually very much a n00b in the theory department, but I kinda have a grasp on the intervals of the major scale.

I also have a question about the be bop scale. It adds the flatted fifth correct? so in E it should ad a Bb right? or no?
#2
Are you asking if people use the major scale? I'm not sure I understand. Don't just learn boxes, learn notes and intervals. And if you're playing in a major key, let's say D major for argument's sake, you're using the D major scale, not the relative minor of B minor. They're entirely different scales.

As for the bebop scales, there are different applications but you always simply add one chromatic note (it becomes an octatonic scale, nice and symmetrical):
1. For a major scale, you add a #5.
2. For a minor scale, you add the major third.
3. For dominant 7th scales you add in the major seventh.

EDIT: If you're thinking b5, you're probably referring to a blues scale.
Last edited by :-D at Mar 22, 2008,
#3
If you're in a mjor key, then a major scale or relative minor would work, but relative minor would have to use the minor scale box shape, or it will have different notes if you use the major shape in the relative minor.

You are correct about the flattenned 5th being a Bb, but I don't know for sure if a flattenned 5th is correct for a Be Bop scale, as I don't know odd scales very well.

edit: the guy above me has explained Be Bop very well, but you CAN play in the relative minor as long as you play the minor scale and not the major.
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Last edited by M.B.MetalTabber at Mar 22, 2008,
#4
Quote by M.B.MetalTabber
but you CAN play in the relative minor as long as you play the minor scale and not the major.


Technically you can, yes, but the scales are different though they contain the same notes. They have different applications and different tonal centers. For example, if you're playing a progression that strongly suggests D major, such as D, G, A, D then you would be using the D major scale; the progression will pull to a tonal center of D and not B minor.
#5
Thanks guys. Like I said, I am not too good at music theory, as I usually play by ear.

To clarify, the first question was asking if blues musicians use the major scale in the genre (I know that most blues uses the pentatonic minor scale) and if so what are some examples.

The second question was asking about the bebop scale which the smiley guy answered quite nicely (I guess that I was confused about this because I was watching a documentary on Be Bop and they referenced the use of the flatted fifth.)
#6
I can't think of any examples off the top of my head, but the major scale is more widely used in blues than you'd imagine. SRV actually has some major scale-based licks in Rude Mood if I remember correctly, actually.

As for the bebop scales, I've never heard of any application where it's had a b5 and been called a bebop scale.
#7
Quote by :-D
I can't think of any examples off the top of my head, but the major scale is more widely used in blues than you'd imagine. SRV actually has some major scale-based licks in Rude Mood if I remember correctly, actually.

As for the bebop scales, I've never heard of any application where it's had a b5 and been called a bebop scale.

I was actually thinking of that song when I wrote this. I think that Hideaway uses a couple major licks too.

And I guess that the documentary (the Ken Burns Jazz documentary) might have just been alluding to the use of the blues scale. I hear the flat fifth in a bunch of Monk songs so I was wondering.


Thanks again btw.
#9
Love that blue note!!!

And those licks were why I asked the question in the first place, but I have maybe heard a switch like that maybe one other time and I think that it was in Lenny.

I will definitely play around with it though, add another dimension to my playing
#10
Quote by imgooley
Love that blue note!!!

And those licks were why I asked the question in the first place, but I have maybe heard a switch like that maybe one other time and I think that it was in Lenny.

I will definitely play around with it though, add another dimension to my playing


So your main point here is that SRV's incredible?

Well, you're right.
#11
Quote by imgooley


To clarify, the first question was asking if blues musicians use the major scale in the genre (I know that most blues uses the pentatonic minor scale) and if so what are some examples.


Absolutely! I think it's pretty safe to say you'd hear it in nearly all blues. It might
be just a single note, an arpeggio, pentatonic major or an entire major scale run
(mostly this would be mixolydian).

It helps to think of the blues scale as just an overall structure to get a certain blues
tonality out of your lines. But, following the harmony with your lines using only the
blues scale is nearly impossible -- you don't have all the notes you need in it. So,
you borrow some from other places which all eventually lead back to the major
scale.