#1
Alright, so I am kinda playing around with the idea of doing a lot of recording up in my room. And at first I thought that the best and easiest way to do this was to buy a computer and blah blah blah...

anyways then I saw this
Tascam Portastudio

So if I buy this Tascam Portastudio, some monitors, and microphones. I'm basically all set to record, without a computer?
Gear:
Ibanez JS100
03 Squier Strat
1980 Ovation Matrix Accoustic
Peavey Valveking 112
Washburn T-14 Taurus (Bass)
SWR Working Pro 100 watt bass amp
#3
nice.
My family has a pc, I do not, and it's pretty hard to record downstairs because of yelling, screaming, tv, radio, etc... so I want to record in my room.

And I was just checking out my options, buying a computer, or if this tascam portastudio would be what I need
Gear:
Ibanez JS100
03 Squier Strat
1980 Ovation Matrix Accoustic
Peavey Valveking 112
Washburn T-14 Taurus (Bass)
SWR Working Pro 100 watt bass amp
#4
I do all my recordings via a very similar SIAB. Specifially a Zoom MRS-1044. All you really need is that machine, mine has effect patches so I don't need any amps. All you do is plug your guitar into that machine and press record and you record along with a drum machine or whatever you want to record to . I love these things. I record my drums via a couple of well placed microphones and then by track I record everything one by one. check out my profile or this thread for some examples.http://ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=817331

EDIT: You can find a whole mess of deals on Ebay, Tascam is not the way to go, I only trust Zoom, Roland, or Boss
Originally posted by J_Dizzle
THAAAANK YOU GoodCharloteSux is god
Last edited by GoodCharloteSux at Mar 22, 2008,
#5
You could simply use that machine, two microphones and some speakers, but since it's digital you might as well use a computer. There's no point buying an all-in-one recording device unless it's analog. So I would say go for something like a Tascam Portastudio 488 MKII instead.
Quote by Godzilla1969
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#6
how much difference will an analog recorder make? do you have any recordings?
Gear:
Ibanez JS100
03 Squier Strat
1980 Ovation Matrix Accoustic
Peavey Valveking 112
Washburn T-14 Taurus (Bass)
SWR Working Pro 100 watt bass amp
#7
Quote by juniorfr3ak
how much difference will an analog recorder make? do you have any recordings?


Most albums recorded in the 20th century were done on analog tape, with a minority done on digital tape. In today's big digital studios, producers use plug-ins designed to emulate the analog sound. Often times a producer will mixdown to two-track tape and master on that, then convert back to digital.

Analog tape provides an amazing sound. The fact that all recorded music before the mid-90's was produced on analog tape should give you a good idea of what it's capable of.
Quote by Godzilla1969
I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

Quote by Pacifica112J
Muphin > You

The Cooperation
#8
Quote by Muphin
Most albums recorded in the 20th century were done on analog tape, with a minority done on digital tape. In today's big digital studios, producers use plug-ins designed to emulate the analog sound. Often times a producer will mixdown to two-track tape and master on that, then convert back to digital.

Analog tape provides an amazing sound. The fact that all recorded music before the mid-90's was produced on analog tape should give you a good idea of what it's capable of.


alright... so analog is obviously capable, but how do I get the sound off tape and onto a cd or computer?
Gear:
Ibanez JS100
03 Squier Strat
1980 Ovation Matrix Accoustic
Peavey Valveking 112
Washburn T-14 Taurus (Bass)
SWR Working Pro 100 watt bass amp
#9
Quote by juniorfr3ak
alright... so analog is obviously capable, but how do I get the sound off tape and onto a cd or computer?


Once you have the mix ready you play it back and use the mixer's tape outs to record the final mix on to whichever medium you choose. It can be a 2-track reel-to-reel machine, cassette deck, CD recorder, or computer.

All you have to do to get your audio on to your computer is route the tape outs of the mixer to the line-in on your family PC and record on the computer with something like Audacity (free audio editor). Then you can encode it to mp3 and do what you like with it.
Quote by Godzilla1969
I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

Quote by Pacifica112J
Muphin > You

The Cooperation
#10
Sounds good, last question.
Can you recommend any of these analog multi-track recorders in the range of about 200 or 300 usd?
Gear:
Ibanez JS100
03 Squier Strat
1980 Ovation Matrix Accoustic
Peavey Valveking 112
Washburn T-14 Taurus (Bass)
SWR Working Pro 100 watt bass amp
#11
Quote by juniorfr3ak
Sounds good, last question.
Can you recommend any of these analog multi-track recorders in the range of about 200 or 300 usd?


Tascam still produces one analog portastudio, the 424. It's cheap, but only a 4-track. This means you can still get 7 tracks out of it with the bouncing technique. If you want an 8-track recorder you might have to look on ebay, in pawn shops, or in local classified ads.
Quote by Godzilla1969
I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

Quote by Pacifica112J
Muphin > You

The Cooperation
#12
Wait, you're saying that producers used CASSETTE recorders to record albums? I think you're getting it a bit muddled up tbh. They would have been using reel to reel tape, or DAT. Not your average cheap cassette tapes.

Maybe im wrong, but im pretty sure they didn't use cassettes.

But Juniorfr3ak, that setup should be fine. They do need maintaining though, just thought i should let you know...
#13
Quote by Rum Monkey
Wait, you're saying that producers used CASSETTE recorders to record albums? I think you're getting it a bit muddled up tbh. They would have been using reel to reel tape, or DAT. Not your average cheap cassette tapes.

Maybe im wrong, but im pretty sure they didn't use cassettes.

But Juniorfr3ak, that setup should be fine. They do need maintaining though, just thought i should let you know...


I never said big-shot producers used cassette tapes. I merely suggested a cassette portastudio. Though, some great albums have been tracked on cassettes. Frank Zappa has done it I believe.

I use a reel-to-reel machine, it's much better than using a computer.
Quote by Godzilla1969
I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

Quote by Pacifica112J
Muphin > You

The Cooperation
#15
Quote by Muphin
I never said big-shot producers used cassette tapes. I merely suggested a cassette portastudio. Though, some great albums have been tracked on cassettes. Frank Zappa has done it I believe.

I use a reel-to-reel machine, it's much better than using a computer.


Ah fair enough mate, misread your post.

How are you liking the reel to reel? At the moment im tossing between a digital/tape multitrack or a reel to reel. Only thing that puts me off of the analogue recorders is the maintenance and cost of tapes.

sorry to hijack the thread! haha, il make my own in a sec...
#16
Quote by Rum Monkey
Ah fair enough mate, misread your post.

How are you liking the reel to reel? At the moment im tossing between a digital/tape multitrack or a reel to reel. Only thing that puts me off of the analogue recorders is the maintenance and cost of tapes.

sorry to hijack the thread! haha, il make my own in a sec...


The tape machine has been great. It's a Fostex R8 (I know, not the greatest). It came with three sealed Ampex tapes and one unsealed, so I've got about 80 minutes of recording time. It's been six months and all I do to maintain it is, after every session, wipe the heads and tape path with a Q-tip soaked in 99% Isopropyl alcohol, which is really cheap.

Tapes do cost quite a bit now, ~$50 for a 7" reel of 1/4" tape. It's worth it for me though. Working with a separate mixer and MTR gives me more routing options, and I just love that sound.
Quote by Godzilla1969
I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

Quote by Pacifica112J
Muphin > You

The Cooperation
#17
To the TS, some copypasta - >


You youngsters... [sigh]

[First, I've owned 10 reel machines, 5 of them multitrack; I've owned scores of cassette machines.]

I certainly won't dispute that recording to good analog tape can have its charms -- but there is nothing good about the cassette format -- except for convenience relative to reel tape.

I remember the first time I heard a stereo cassette recorder... probably around the end of the 60s. It sounded horrible. The Sony machine cost as much as a decent used car (about $500 -- about $8,000 adjusted for inflation) and it sounded far, far, far worse than the $135 reel deck I bought around the same time. The high end was nearly non existent and the flutter was horrible.

Anyhow, certainly, cassettes improved...

The last cassette deck I bought -- back around '94 or '95 -- cost just under $800 (in those much bigger 90's dollars -- so, what? $1100 in today's dollars?)


Anyhow, my bona fides out of the way...

I think cassettes suck and always will. I could live with the hiss. I could live with the lack of high end. But I can't live with the flutter and speed issues.

When I got my first DAT recorder in '89, I couldn't believe how much better acoustic guitar -- or even sampled acoustic piano -- sounded recorded without the speed/flutter/wow problems I'd been putting up with from my reel machines.

I dunno... I don't think I'd bother with cassette. Maybe an old four track reel to reel. But it's hard finding one in good shape. Still, the late 70s and very early 80s reel machines are built like tanks compared to the Portastudio/etc machines that 'replaced' them.

Also, the later reel machines from companies like TASCAM and Fostex, particularly the narrow format [8 on 1/4", 16 on 1/2" -- or heaven forfend -- those idiotic cassette 8 tracks] are usually quite tinky, themselves -- and even hissier when not using noise reduction.


Ah... and as long as we're talking noise reduction -- a lot of young recordists, swayed by the buzz on analog tape, buy these compromised machines, find the hiss so bad they have to use the noise reduction and then, they try to hit the tape hot!

Big friggin' mistake -- particularly with the clumsy dbx NR scheme (2:1 audio compression on record; 1:2 expansion on playback) magnifies any dynamic tracking error -- like hitting the tape hard or -- watch out cassette kiddies -- dropouts [which cassettes are infamous for].



Feel free to go for a reel to reel, but I would avoid cassettes like rabid cows.
#18
I would say go for the digital MTR...
Routing audio to the line in on a stock sound card probably isn't the best thing to do...so you would need some type of interface to get the audio onto the PC.

For a small home studio I just don't see the point in going with a large analog setup. I think a fair sized MTR is good enough for the average home studio....but it comes down to preference and although analog is nice to have, it really isn't mandatory IMO.

Also there was a video done a while back testing between analog and digital audio, most of the people listening could not hear any difference at all.


BTW if you go all analog, you'll need a mixer with good preamps in it and a nice amount of aux outs, a reel to reel recorder, tapes for that recorder which can get high in price and wont last forever..., and you'll need to buy rack mount FX and gear which really drives up cost.
You can't rearrange tracks on a screen meaning you must play it on time and correctly, if you mess up, you must redo that part from start to end.

I just think digital format is more convent...
Last edited by moody07747 at Mar 25, 2008,
#19
^ I agree. I'd love to buy an analogue rig, simply for the extra skills you would learn, plus the discipline needed, but it just costs too much to buy all the stuff that you need.
There is poetry in despair.
#20
Well thanks for the info! I ordered a Tascam DP-02CF and an AT3035 condenser mic. If the tascam isn't up to standards I plan on sending it back, but hopefully it will be exactly what I need it to be.
Gear:
Ibanez JS100
03 Squier Strat
1980 Ovation Matrix Accoustic
Peavey Valveking 112
Washburn T-14 Taurus (Bass)
SWR Working Pro 100 watt bass amp
#22
Yeah I know, the flash card is kind of obnoxious, but it should be something I can deal with
Gear:
Ibanez JS100
03 Squier Strat
1980 Ovation Matrix Accoustic
Peavey Valveking 112
Washburn T-14 Taurus (Bass)
SWR Working Pro 100 watt bass amp