#1
With E as root: E Bb D Ab B# Gb

It's not a "guess the chord" - I'm genuinely confused. How would you write it? like E?? What the hell would be its application?
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#3
...That's not a chord.

The Bb is a diminished 5th. The D is a minor or diminished 7th. The Ab is the 3rd. The Gb is a minor 3rd. It's just a bunch of random notes that sound really bad, together.
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#4
D7add13/E i think..?

Edit: actually now tht i think of it...it'll be a A#11 chord with the F raised to F#, which is wtf???
Last edited by dead hate at Mar 22, 2008,
#5
Well, for starters, B# isn't a note, and it can't even be used in the key of the chord as there is already a Bb in there, so the chord is E Bb D Ab C Gb, which means it has

E, b5, major 7th, major 10th, minor 6th (or dimished 6th, not sure though I think that would actually be Cb) and major 16th.

I have no idea how that'd be written though, it is, however, a chord Haha, Crackhead. Just because it sounds terrible doesn't mean it isn't a chord.
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#6
Quote by duncang
Well, for starters, B# isn't a note, and it can't even be used in the key of the chord as there is already a Bb in there, so the chord is E Bb D Ab C Gb, which means it has

E, b5, major 7th, major 10th, minor 6th (or dimished 6th, not sure though I think that would actually be Cb) and major 16th.

I have no idea how that'd be written though.


B# is a note, but it happens to be the wrong note for whatever key the TS is in right now.
#7
Quote by ouchies
B# is a note, but it happens to be the wrong note for whatever key the TS is in right now.


Yeah that's what I meant. You can't use the B# in that chord.
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im more of a social godzilla than chameleon

Quote by MetalMessiah665
Alright, I'll give them a try, Japanese Black Speed rarely disappoints.

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Hmm judging from your pic you'd fit in more with a fat busted tribute.
#8
E.
Its the root note, so thats the chord.

Edit:
A B# is a note, its just a C
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#9
Quote by porchmonkey4lif
E.
Its the root note, so thats the chord.


So you're saying that chord is just E? E major?
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im more of a social godzilla than chameleon

Quote by MetalMessiah665
Alright, I'll give them a try, Japanese Black Speed rarely disappoints.

Quote by azzemojo
Hmm judging from your pic you'd fit in more with a fat busted tribute.
#10
Could be inverted and E another note of the chord... or it could be another chord with E acting as bass note this meaning a slash chord.


I dunno which though.
#11
What you have there is three tritones each a wholestep apart. Out of context, I'd call that wholetone harmony and therefore, named for convenience after the root, an E7#5.
#12
First of all, this is what was really bothering me. (I'm the TS) - The inclusion of a b5 and #5 doesn't make any sense for me...but it should be a chord and not just a cluster of chromatic notes. So yes, the B# had to be C(6th which in this case makes less sense then a B# imo)...but I just couldn't figure it out. It is theoretically a chord...man I'm going to have to think about this...

EDIT: whoo, thx again Nick...I'll have to think about that for a sec.
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Last edited by KryptNet at Mar 22, 2008,
#13
This is every note of the E whole-tone scale played as a chord. The name of it would be X9b5#5, where X is any note in the chord. Possible voicings:

e-4--6--8--10--12--14--------------
B-3--5--7--9---11--13--------------
G-3--5--7--9---11--13-------------
D-2--4--6--8---10--12-------------
A-3--5--7--9---11--13-------------
E-2--4--6--8---10--12-------------
#14
very cool guyz thx, so hows about(staying with root E) an E7add9b5#5? Oh man is that weird. I gotta figure out a way to use this just to throw a wrench in people's ears.
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#16
Quote by KryptNet
very cool guyz thx, so hows about(staying with root E) an E7add9b5#5? Oh man is that weird. I gotta figure out a way to use this just to throw a wrench in people's ears.


On a lead sheet 7#5 should be sufficient to convey the chord. Naming it further is pointless because at that point of specificity you should just write out the voicing.

Also note that it's 5 other 7#5 chords in inversion as well.
#17
I'd write it as:

E Bb D G# C F#

What we have here is E7b5
E Bb D G#

C is a flat 6, and F# is a 9.
E7b5b6add9 perhaps?

I'm not even close to an expert on chord nomenclature, just a guess.
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#18
Quote by Nick_
On a lead sheet 7#5 should be sufficient to convey the chord. Naming it further is pointless because at that point of specificity you should just write out the voicing.

Also note that it's 5 other 7#5 chords in inversion as well.
I mean you're right...I agree it's most like a x7#5 chord after you mentioned it. But theoretically they're must be a "correct" way of writing out the chord to specify what voicing the composer would want...so this is now purely a question of curiosity in what the most standard chord annotation would be for an un-standard voicing. if that makes any sense
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#19
E Bb D Ab B# Gb

Root,b5,b7 Ab=G# 3,b13,Gb=F# 9


so R,3,b5,b7,9,b13

E dominant 9th flat 5,flat 13
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#20
Quote by KryptNet
I mean you're right...I agree it's most like a x7#5 chord after you mentioned it. But theoretically they're must be a "correct" way of writing out the chord to specify what voicing the composer would want...so this is now purely a question of curiosity in what the most standard chord annotation would be for an un-standard voicing. if that makes any sense


If you have a specific voicing you want to convey, write it out on a staff. You'll see this in a real book for songs like So What where the exact voicing is a critical part of the song's sound. Otherwise, if you intend to merely specify the harmony, a condensed symbol (by Levine's reference, 7#5 means wholetone means the entire 9b5#5 chord ... of course this certainly might appear on a lead sheet where an altered chord is intended, same with 7b9 chords, which don't always mean diminished. Use your ears) is usually fine.

Hell if you write it out in a way that makes sense I'm sure people will understand what you mean. But at a certain point, staff and notes work best.
#21
Quote by Nick_
If you have a specific voicing you want to convey, write it out on a staff. You'll see this in a real book for songs like So What where the exact voicing is a critical part of the song's sound. Otherwise, if you intend to merely specify the harmony, a condensed symbol (by Levine's reference, 7#5 means wholetone means the entire 9b5#5 chord ... of course this certainly might appear on a lead sheet where an altered chord is intended, same with 7b9 chords, which don't always mean diminished. Use your ears) is usually fine.

Hell if you write it out in a way that makes sense I'm sure people will understand what you mean. But at a certain point, staff and notes work best.
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#22
Quote by Muphin
I'd write it as:

E Bb D G# C F#

What we have here is E7b5
E Bb D G#

C is a flat 6, and F# is a 9.
E7b5b6add9 perhaps?

I'm not even close to an expert on chord nomenclature, just a guess.


I would rather think of it as :

E, A#, D, G#, B#, F#

Arranged they become :

E, G#, B#, D, F#, A#

Scale degrees :
(1, 3, #5, b7, 9, #11)

E, G#, B# is E+.

D, F#, A# is D+.

You could call it E9+(#11). Possibly D+/E+, but that might not be correct nomenclature.
#23
Quote by isaac_bandits
Possibly D+/E+, but that might not be correct nomenclature.


That's not only correct but I prefer it

Breaking up complex chords into a pair of component triads makes things so much easier
#24
Quote by Nick_
That's not only correct but I prefer it

Breaking up complex chords into a pair of component triads makes things so much easier


So would that be "polychord"?

Does polychord also include things like C/E, where the notes are arranged E, C, G? or does that have a different name?
#25
Quote by isaac_bandits
So would that be "polychord"?

Does polychord also include things like C/E, where the notes are arranged E, C, G? or does that have a different name?


I've only seen those referred to as "slash chords". The term "polychord" would (to me) make much more sense for something built off of component triads.
#26
Quote by :-D
I've only seen those referred to as "slash chords". The term "polychord" would (to me) make much more sense for something built off of component triads.

I have seen "slash chords" referred to as "polychords", but I've never used it myself. I prefer your terms, which is what I use.

EDIT: Wiki confirms your terms.
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#27
Taydr: I have seen that as well, but semantically the term "polychord" would not seem to apply to a slash chord. "Poly" = more than one, so the application with component triads works. A slash chord simply implies a chord with a non-root note in the base, which to me does not constitute multiple chords.

That's just my take on it though.
#28
Quote by :-D
Taydr: I have seen that as well, but semantically the term "polychord" would not seem to apply to a slash chord. "Poly" = more than one, so the application with component triads works. A slash chord simply implies a chord with a non-root note in the base, which to me does not constitute multiple chords.

That's just my take on it though.


Ahhh. That's what I was saying. Unfortunately, there is still some confusion for me. A chord written C/E could mean E, G#, B, C, E, G, or it could mean E, C, G.

Or would a polychord need to specifically state that E is a chord by using the "maj" qualifier, rather than leaving it without, which would constitute it as a note?
#29
Unfortunately with are system of notation it is far to easy to confuse polychords with slash chords

As long as you make it clear you should be fine.
#30
Quote by isaac_bandits
Ahhh. That's what I was saying. Unfortunately, there is still some confusion for me. A chord written C/E could mean E, G#, B, C, E, G, or it could mean E, C, G.

Or would a polychord need to specifically state that E is a chord by using the "maj" qualifier, rather than leaving it without, which would constitute it as a note?


As far as I know, the chord after the slash would have to have a qualifier. This would be the easiest way to avoid confusion. For example, your C/E would imply E C G because there's nothing stating that the E is anything more than a bass note. In order to refer to it as a polychord, you have to notate exactly what the chord after the slash is.
#31
Quote by :-D
As far as I know, the chord after the slash would have to have a qualifier. This would be the easiest way to avoid confusion. For example, your C/E would imply E C G because there's nothing stating that the E is anything more than a bass note. In order to refer to it as a polychord, you have to notate exactly what the chord after the slash is.


So I would call it C/Emaj ?
#32
Quote by isaac_bandits
So I would call it C/Emaj ?


If you're referring to your E G# B C E G example, then I personally would say it's best to call it C/Emaj, yes.
#33
Quote by Nick_
That's not only correct but I prefer it

Breaking up complex chords into a pair of component triads makes things so much easier
I dunno...the slash can be so ambiguous. I would probably prefer not to use it in a lead sheet in this application.
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#34
Quote by KryptNet
I dunno...the slash can be so ambiguous. I would probably prefer not to use it in a lead sheet in this application.


In the case of D+/E+, the example used, how would the slash be ambiguous?
#35
On a lead sheet it wouldn't be written as D+/E+ but

D+
E+

A slash chord is notated as A/E, so there's no ambiguity between the two.
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#36
Quote by sinan90
On a lead sheet it wouldn't be written as D+/E+ but

D+
E+

A slash chord is notated as A/E, so there's no ambiguity between the two.


Ahhh, that would be good, but unfortunately, it is inconvenient to do that in a forum post. Luckily polychords aren't terribly popular, so we needn't worry.