#1
I was reading a piece in Total Guitar magazine (March 08, p.15) and it described a riff as being in the "guitar friendly key of E minor [E F# G A B C D]..."

What makes the key of E minor 'guitar friendly'? Are some keys more guitar friendly than others?
Last edited by geetarmanic at Mar 22, 2008,
#2
The E minor pentatonic includes all the open strings of the guitar.
#5
because its got easy positions all over the fretboard, open, 7th and a little box at the 12th. seriously easiest key to solo in at the beginning
#7
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
Because it lets you utilize all the notes on the fretboard.

No it doesn't.

Come to think of it, why would it allow the use of "more notes" any more than any other key?
Last edited by CowboyUp at Mar 22, 2008,
#8
Some keys ARE more guitar-friendly than others. First off, E Minor is easy to remember since there is only one sharp. Second, all the open strings in standard tuning are in the key of E minor. Most of the chords in E minor are open chords. In other keys, you'd have to fret more notes and use more barre chords.
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#9
Quote by CowboyUp
No it doesn't.

Come to think of it, why would it allow the use of "more notes" any more than any other key?


Certain keys dont allow you to use certain notes effectively. IE, open E in the key of Db. Where as in E min, you have access to the widest range of notes.
#10
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
Certain keys dont allow you to use certain notes effectively. IE, open E in the key of Db. Where as in E min, you have access to the widest range of notes.

There are only 11 notes. In a diatonic key, there are only 7. In any key, you can use any of those notes as accidentals if you really want to.
#11
Quote by CowboyUp
There are only 11 notes. In a diatonic key, there are only 7. In any key, you can use any of those notes as accidentals if you really want to.


You can, but you usually wouldnt. I mean, yes E is the minor third of Db, so it might not be the best example. But certain keys have notes that dont sound very friendly with an open E in them. And this thread is after all about the friendliness of a key.'

EDIT: And technically the melodic minor scale, which is usually considered diatonic, has more then 7 tones because its different ascending and descending.
#13
Quote by GoDrex
actually there are 12 notes


Oh, nvm. I see what you mean.
Last edited by zeppelinfreak51 at Mar 23, 2008,
#14
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
You can, but you usually wouldnt. I mean, yes E is the minor third of Db, so it might not be the best example. But certain keys have notes that dont sound very friendly with an open E in them. And this thread is after all about the friendliness of a key.


He has a good point.

A good example could be the key of C#. This key means you cannot use any open strings (in standard tuning). So that can really limit your playing - not vastly, but youre screwed if all you play is metal.
#15
Quote by blair30
He has a good point.

A good example could be the key of C#. This key means you cannot use any open strings (in standard tuning). So that can really limit your playing - not vastly, but youre screwed if all you play is metal.

Yes you could. There is no mystical barrier preventing you from playing open strings.
#17
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
You can, but you usually wouldnt. I mean, yes E is the minor third of Db, so it might not be the best example. But certain keys have notes that dont sound very friendly with an open E in them. And this thread is after all about the friendliness of a key.'

EDIT: And technically the melodic minor scale, which is usually considered diatonic, has more then 7 tones because its different ascending and descending.


I think what this guy means is that you can fit more octaves of Emin scale into the fretboard than any other key. But only if you have 24 frets really...
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#18
I think the most guitar friendly key is C major, or A natural minor..
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#19
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
You can, but you usually wouldnt. I mean, yes E is the minor third of Db, so it might not be the best example. But certain keys have notes that dont sound very friendly with an open E in them. And this thread is after all about the friendliness of a key.'

EDIT: And technically the melodic minor scale, which is usually considered diatonic, has more then 7 tones because its different ascending and descending.


No. C# to E is a minor third, Db to E is an augmented second. And you can't say that a key absolutely will not sound "friendly" with a certain note; you have the same amount of freedom in all keys. In addition, sometimes the fact that a note is not in a specific key allows for interesting chromatics.