#1
how much guitar playing experience (Time playing guitar) do you need to play this solo. I played for about 3 months a year ago, i quit, but i started again 4 months ago, and i think i'm intermediate, i can play these solos: Stairway to heaven, you shook me all nighht long, welcome to the jungle, thunderstruck, highway to hell and the first sol of paradise city.

I attempted sweet child o mine solo, and i was doing pretty good until is started trying too hard and completely mucked up my technique, so i stopped that one and had a break, but that was about 2 months ago.

SO do you think i'll be able to learn this outro, if not, how much more time before i should attempt it?
#2
Generic answer:

Practice.

People pick different stuff up at different speeds. Back when I had only 3 years under my belt, I could play Rush's Freewill but anything AC/DC just completely messed me up.

Try something new; it doesn't have to be easier, could even be harder. Not too much though. Then go back to it.
#3
How do you practise, i get excited and start playing songs fast before i've gotten to that stage and completely stuffed them, that's what happenned with SCOM. SO how do you practise?
#4
Play along with the song. Take fast sections and practice them with a metronome (clicking beat). Slow them way down and practice it slow until you have it nailed, then slowly build up speed until you can play it at the original tempo.
#6
Quote by /\AC/\DC/\
How do you practise, i get excited and start playing songs fast before i've gotten to that stage and completely stuffed them, that's what happenned with SCOM. SO how do you practise?


The two keys for me in terms of practice are organization and variation. I have so many things that I want to work on (but who doesn't?) that I can't afford to begin practicing without a set schedule. Dividing your time really allows you to focus your energy well, and if you want you can take breaks in between sections of practice to make things easier for yourself. Set a schedule, dividing certain things you want to accomplish into specific amounts of time and make sure you get in quality practice on a few areas as opposed to half-assed 5 minute practice sessions on seventy-six different techniques. You'll want to practice with a metronome for even, accurate playing; after you've perfected something at a specific speed, increase the tempo by about 8 beats per minute or whatever you feel you can handle while maintaining optimal technique.

My best advice in terms of what to practice is to not overdo it on the technical side of things. I never practice purely technical exercises for more than an hour (give or take 15 minutes depending on how I feel). The reasoning behind this is that if your muscles begin to get tired, they'll naturally fail to function as well as they normally would, and you'll fall into bad technical habits. In this respect, you also have to make sure that you are getting techniques down perfectly and then moving to higher speeds with a metronome; it's all muscle memory, and it's simple logic. If your muscles are trained in a more precise manner, you'll play in a more precise manner. Stretches can help immensely both with and without the guitar; you'll loosen yourself up so you can practice more effectively and with less risk of injury.

Combining these, I'll give you my practice schedule as it was written down for today. The amount of time is completely up to you depending on how much you want to accomplish.

15 minutes warm-up stretches and exercise
30 minutes chromatic runs
20 minutes alternate picking runs
20 minutes six-string sweeps with picking hand extensions
40 minutes practice of jazz combo material
30 minutes sight-reading etudes
40 minutes practice of jazz progressions
Jazz improvisation for no specific period of time

I had specific areas I focused on for set periods of time in multiple areas of study; for me, this is what works best.

Hopefully you can use this as a template and get started in the right direction.
#7
Thanks so much, this will help me heaps, what kind of warm ups do you do in those 15 mins.
#10
i assume you've quoted me for my brilliance ^

anywho,

the way to get good is to just get your damn hands on your guitar for hours a day. theres no way around it. i used to sit in front of the tv and just run my left hand fingers through patterns with no particular thought involved. this gets your fingers able to do things that they need to do, a large part of guitar playing is getting your muscles in shape! basically, i would play solid until i didn't want to play anymore and was getting fed up with lack of progress. then before bed i would pick up the guitar and play and discover how much better i had gotten through hours of ardous practice without realizing it.

you'll get there if you truly want to.
A fool is not one who makes a mistake, a fool is one who does not learn from it.
-me HAH!
#11
Yes, you were quoted for your brilliance and for that reason alone.

You also just described sitting in front of the TV and noodling with one hand as arduous practice.
#12
quite obviously you couldn't hope to play the guitar if that was ALL you did. maybe that's not so obvious to you though...
A fool is not one who makes a mistake, a fool is one who does not learn from it.
-me HAH!
#13
Quote by Takendergib
quite obviously you couldn't hope to play the guitar if that was ALL you did. maybe that's not so obvious to you though...


No, it's perfectly obvious actually. This is the reason I sit down in a quiet environment with no distractions in order to get the most of of my practice time as opposed to repeating legato licks while trying to figure out the value of the toaster featured on The Price Is Right.
#14
haha that actually made me laugh ^

well sure if you are that disciplined you probably do yourself alot of good practicing proper all the time. my practicing tends to be sporadic but consistent, if that makes sense. i play every day without fail, but its usually just when i feel like it/ have free time.
A fool is not one who makes a mistake, a fool is one who does not learn from it.
-me HAH!