#1
How do I improve speed?
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#2
Practice with your best friend (the metronome) a lot and push your limits and put the tempo to above your comfort zone
#3
Define speed.
Speed of your fingers?
Speed of your picking?
Too vague.
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#4
Play slow at first until you have it down.
Slowly increase your speed over the course of a long time (maybe just a little per day)
Remember that you don't have to pick every note, hammer ons and pull offs are your friend when it comes to speed.
#6
I mean Speed as in picking - "shredding", I have been practising with a metronome, just alternate 1234 stuff, but it's just not really improving much, i've started really slow and gone up as fast as I could. I can only play 4 notes a beat at 85, i'd like to increase that alot, what do you guys suggest i do?

cheers.

also it seems my picking hand is faster then my left.
Quote by Finnepinne
It was probably a black man who talked. "oh don' go in there gurl, he behind the doh~"

And then got shot.
Last edited by SteveBeginner at Mar 23, 2008,
#8
Quote by SteveBeginner
I mean Speed as in picking - "shredding", I have been practising with a metronome, just alternate 1234 stuff, but it's just not really improving much, i've started really slow and gone up as fast as I could. I can only play 4 notes a beat at 85, i'd like to increase that alot, what do you guys suggest i do?

cheers.

also it seems my picking hand is faster then my left.


Forget speed.

The only thing that matters is co-ordination. If you're accurate and you're hands are working together then you play quicker. However, if you simply "try to play faster" you'll invariably neglect those two things and get no better. The metronome is there to help your timing, it's not a speedometer.

Basically.

Trying to get faster=fail
Not trying to get faster and instead concentrating on accuracy=speed as byproduct
Actually called Mark!

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#9
Quote by steven seagull
Forget speed.

The only thing that matters is co-ordination. If you're accurate and you're hands are working together then you play quicker. However, if you simply "try to play faster" you'll invariably neglect those two things and get no better. The metronome is there to help your timing, it's not a speedometer.

Basically.

Trying to get faster=fail

Not trying to get faster and instead concentrating on accuracy=speed as byproduct


Absolutely. Speed comes from accuracy. Practice slowly, ie. a pace that you are comfortable with. Every note must sound clear. Also, don't just practice chromatic 1234s up and down the neck. While they are great with finger movement, practice scales as well, because you'll be using them more than 1234s, and scales help with finger independence. With 1234s, your fingers are doing the same thing each time, whereas with scales you have to think about moving your fingers into different spots.

Keep doing it at a comfortable pace, don't rush ahead. When you can do it at a certain BPM comfortably, then, and only then, can you move up a notch. Then you repeat all of that again, until you are comfortable with it.

By the way, don't make this silly mistake that I once did: Don't assume that after 15 minutes of playing a certain BPM you are "comfortable" and ready to move up. This is weeks of work, not a couple of hours. Practice for a day or more on one BPM, then move up.
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#10
Quote by steven seagull
Forget speed.

The only thing that matters is co-ordination. If you're accurate and you're hands are working together then you play quicker. However, if you simply "try to play faster" you'll invariably neglect those two things and get no better. The metronome is there to help your timing, it's not a speedometer.

Basically.

Trying to get faster=fail
Not trying to get faster and instead concentrating on accuracy=speed as byproduct

Hey man that really helped me alot and it wasn't even my question lol. Ill keep that in mind and do you mind if I add you to friends?
#11
The post on accuracy is correct, and there is something else, too.

You must, at all costs, eliminate tension from your fingers while practicing. The more you tense up, the more it gets locked into your muscle memory. Then, when you try to play faster, it's like stepping on the gas and the break at the same time.

If you cannot play something correctly, and you try to "force" it by playing faster, you are not only being sloppy, but you are actually training yourself to play sloppy in the future. You are literally undoing your progress. The reason is that repeated movement while in a state of tension programs that tension into your muscle memory. Alternately, repeated movement while in a relaxed state trains the muscles to play easily and accurately. This is why my first teacher always told me, "If you can't play it correctly, do it slower until you do."

Do what is called "no tempo practice." This means playing something extremely s-l-o-w-l-y, to the point where you fret one note, pick it, and then relax into that position. Then you go on to the next and repeat. Concentrate very closely on the way the muscles in your hand are moving. Don't do this for too long. Five to fifteen minutes at most. Then go back to the metronome.

If you understand the concept of playing slowly and accurately, as well as that of paying close attention to your hand (and body) being relaxed, you will be miles ahead of the majority of guitarists.

I recommend you this article:

http://www.guitarnoise.com/article.php?id=490

Beyond that, practice scales. This may not seem like it has anything to do with speed but remember: speed is a byproduct of accuracy. The best way to increase accuracy is to practice scales. Learn them in position and also moving all over the fretboard. Do them until your hand moves in those patterns automatically, without you having to even think about it.

Most importantly, learn to ENJOY practice. People who find practice "boring" or claim they "don't have the patience" to practice simply do not understand what they are doing, so they don't see the benefit. When you practice, you should have a feeling of anticipation, knowing that with every minute spent practicing, you are a little better than the minute prior.
Last edited by Angel Martin at Mar 24, 2008,
#12
That is a very good read, helped me a lot. I usually end up straining myself so hard that my wrist gets numb. But now i can do the same pattern over and over without any discomfort.
#13
I'm pretty sure that the very fact that you're consciously trying to get faster and therefore mentally putting pressure on yourself contributes even more tension.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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