#1
Hey guys I was wondering - what is the difference between an augmented chord and an augmented 6th chord... and how are these chords used?

An example of say, a Caugmented and a Caugmented 6 in Tab would be great also.

Thanks, Michal
#2
An augmented chord is built by stacking major thirds. It has the formula: 1-3-#5
An augmented sixth chord is a major chord with an augmented sixth: 1-3-5-#6
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
Quote by Archeo Avis
An augmented chord is built by stacking major thirds. It has the formula: 1-3-#5
An augmented sixth chord is a major chord with an augmented sixth: 1-3-5-#6


Isn't that the same as a 1-3-5-b7 and thus a dominant 7th chord?
#4
Quote by michal23
Isn't that the same as a 1-3-5-b7 and thus a dominant 7th chord?


It is not the same. The notes are enharmonic, but they are used in completely different situations. They are not interchangeable.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
Quote by Archeo Avis
It is not the same. The notes are enharmonic, but they are used in completely different situations. They are not interchangeable.


Adding to this.

The reason why they are both used while enharmonic, is that they resolve differently. In a dominant seventh chord, the tritone between the third and seventh should resolve to a major third or minor sixth, with both notes moving one semitone in contrary motion.

With the augmented sixth chord, the root and sixth will both move outward one semitone to form an octave with each other.

Augmented sixth chords must contain accidentals in diatonic keys. Dominant sevenths can be made when harmonizing diatonic scales without accidentals.
#6
why is the sixth referred to as augmented? ive been taught only 2 4 and 5 are referred to as diminished or augmented
Quote by beadhangingOne
There is no music but metal and muhammad is its prophet.
#7
Quote by EZLN libertad
why is the sixth referred to as augmented? ive been taught only 2 4 and 5 are referred to as diminished or augmented


It is called augmented because you are raising a major interval.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
^ Nope. In a major scale the tonic is perfect, then second and third are major, the fourth and fifth are perfect and the sixth and seventh are major and the octave is perfect.

To augment an interval, you raise either a major or a perfect interval by one semitone. When you lower an interval by a semitone the name it gets depends on whether or not it is a major or a perfect interval. If you lower a major interval by a semitone it becomes a minor interval. If you lower this minor interval AGAIN, it becomes diminished. However, if you lower a perfect interval ONCE it becomes diminished.

I'm sorry if that wasn't very clear without any examples, but I've got to go now so perhaps I'll edit some examples in later.
#11
Quote by michal23
Isn't that the same as a 1-3-5-b7 and thus a dominant 7th chord?


No, different situations call for specific uses of either chord. They're the same notes but they'll resolve differently. There's obviously a tritone in each chord, but the motion is reversed; the dominant seventh chord will resolve by moving the third up and moving the seventh down. However, the augmented sixth chord will resolve the tritone to a third by moving the third down and moving the augmented sixth up.

In my experience, I've seen augmented sixth chords resolve quite frequently and nicely to the triad a minor second below.
Last edited by :-D at Mar 23, 2008,
#12
Augmented sixth chords are actually completely different. They're loosely enharmonic to a dominant 7th rooted in the b6 of the key. I say loosely because the Italian has only the 1 3 and #6, and either the French or German has a #4(I think, I also can't remember which), the other being enharmonic a dominant seventh(1 3 5 #6 like Arch and others said). It's an augmented 6th as opposed to a minor 7th because of the resolution stuff they've all mentioned.

EDIT: French has the #4(supertonic/2nd of the key) with German having the regular ol' fifth(b3 of key).
Last edited by grampastumpy at Mar 23, 2008,
#13
Quote by Tsunoyukami
^ Nope. In a major scale the tonic is perfect, then second and third are major, the fourth and fifth are perfect and the sixth and seventh are major and the octave is perfect.

To augment an interval, you raise either a major or a perfect interval by one semitone. When you lower an interval by a semitone the name it gets depends on whether or not it is a major or a perfect interval. If you lower a major interval by a semitone it becomes a minor interval. If you lower this minor interval AGAIN, it becomes diminished. However, if you lower a perfect interval ONCE it becomes diminished.

I'm sorry if that wasn't very clear without any examples, but I've got to go now so perhaps I'll edit some examples in later.


So to make it clearer. An augmented interval is one semitone higher than a major or perfect interval. A diminished interval is one semitone lower than a minor or perfect interval.

Just out of curiosity, is there a name for one semitone MORE than an augmented interval?

For example, what interval would Cb-D# qualify as? The notes are a _____ second apart, but it is four semitones and an augmented second is only three. Or would that interval be deemed counterintuitive, and thus not have a proper name?
#14
Quote by isaac_bandits
So to make it clearer. An augmented interval is one semitone higher than a major or perfect interval. A diminished interval is one semitone lower than a minor or perfect interval.

Just out of curiosity, is there a name for one semitone MORE than an augmented interval?

For example, what interval would Cb-D# qualify as? The notes are a _____ second apart, but it is four semitones and an augmented second is only three. Or would that interval be deemed counterintuitive, and thus not have a proper name?


That'd be a third, not a second, if using a diatonic scale. In that case it would be a Major third I believe.

Unless I'm missing something, which is a popular disclaimer for me.
#15
Quote by isaac_bandits
For example, what interval would Cb-D# qualify as? The notes are a _____ second apart, but it is four semitones and an augmented second is only three. Or would that interval be deemed counterintuitive, and thus not have a proper name?
Without context, I would say write it B-D# or Cb-Eb and call it a major third.

In your scenario, I would call it a double sharpened second, though this may not be a standard name for an interval.
#16
Quote by Tsunoyukami
Excuse me, but shouldn't that be a major OR a perfect interval?


No, because we're talking about a major interval.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#17
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Without context, I would say write it B-D# or Cb-Eb and call it a major third.

In your scenario, I would call it a double sharpened second, though this may not be a standard name for an interval.


I didn't expect there to actually be a context for this interval. It would need a heptatonic scale like (Cb, D#, E, F, G, A, Bb) which would be rather useless. Any scale that is not heptatonic would be able to change the note names to their enharmonics, making this a major third interval.

Myself I would have thought of it as a "double augmented second"