#1
I'm sure most of you have noticed that there are three pentatonic scales hidden inside each of the major and minor scales. For instance, the seven-note B minor scale contains all the pentatonic shapes for E minor, B minor and C# minor.

But can someone point me to a lesson that teaches more about this? I want to know, among other things, what this is called, how the sets of three pentatonic scales are related to the parent seven-note scale and about ways to leap back and forth between the sets of pentatonic child scales while making sense musically.

Thanks for providing direction
#2
Well, the intervals between the root of the pentatonic minor scale and the rest of the notes are: minor third, Perfect Fourth, Perfect Fifth, and minor seventh. If you analyze the major or minor scales, you can find that these intervals exist from 3 different degrees of the major scale: the 2nd, 3rd, and 6th. Here's that analysis:
1st degree(tonic): major second, major third, Perfect Fourth, Perfect Fifth, Major Sixth, Major Seventh
2nd degree(supertonic): Major Second, Minor Third, Perfect Fourth, Perfect Fifth, Major Sixth, Minor Seventh
3rd degree(mediant): minor second, minor third, perfect fourth, perfect fifth, minor sixth, minor seventh
4th degree(subdominant): major second, major third, augmented fourth, perfect fifth, major sixth, major seventh
5th degree(dominant): major second, major third, perfect fourth, perfect fifth, major sixth, minor seventh
6th degree(submediant): major second, minor third, perfect fourth, perfect fifth, minor sixth, minor seventh
7th degree(leading tone): minor second, minor third, perfect fourth, diminished fifth, minor sixth, minor seventh

So in the key of C major or A minor, you have the A minor pentatonic, D minor Pentatonic, and E minor pentatonic scales readily available. They have the following notes:
Am pent.: A-C-D-E-G
Dm pent.: D-F-G-A-C
Em pent.: E-G-A-B-D

If we line up the notes based on a common note, A in this case, we can see how they relate to each other:
A-C-D-E-G (Am pent.)
A-C-D-F-G (Dm pent.: change the E from Am pent. to an F to get here)
A-B-D-E-G (Em. pent.: change the C from Am. pent to a B to get here; or, change the C and F from Dm pent. to B and E, respectively, to get here.)

Use Guitar Pro to come up with a simple one or two chord vamp and loop it many times while improvising over it with each of these scales. One good practice idea is to change scales but stay in the same position, only altering the notes that you play. This will help you immensely with transitioning between different scales.
#3
One good practice idea is to change scales but stay in the same position, only altering the notes that you play. This will help you immensely with transitioning between different scales.QUOTE]

That's what I just started doing yesterday, and it's been kind of a breakthrough for me. Formerly I had been using one pentatonic minor scale over three chords (like Em pent for E-A-B chord progression) and enjoying how the scale "changes colors" with the changing chords. But that gets dull after a few years.

I always marvelled at the way guitarists changes the scales they are playing in and arrive at these unexpected and intensely moving notes that nevertheless make sense. Whenever I tried to do it, it just sounded like dissonance though.

This way, I can stick to the pentatonic shapes that I know and change keys (is that right?) while staying in one parent scale.

Thanks for the explanation. Is there a site or lesson that explores this further with diagrams and examples? And, again, is there a name for this?