#1
So I have a relatively broad background in music. I've played violin, trumpet, piano, guitar, etc... I understand how to read music. I understand how scales work, intervals, chords, modes (for the most part although I don't have them memorized or anything...) but I can't seem to apply them. When I improvise while I'm practicing, I always find myself staying in a pentatonic box or something along those lines, and I don't feel like I'm making any progress. I know this wasn't a very specific request, but can anybody help me out? Where do I go from here?!?

Thanks a ****ton
#2
so........ what are you wanting?
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#3
Help with impovising. Scales to learn, when to apply them, how to transition between different positions of that scale throughout the neck.
#5
I'd highly recommend "Sheets of Sound". It's a really nice book of useful scale
studies that will reallty help you a lot with all those things you mentioned. If you
commit yourself to working through a number of the studies in there, I think you'll
find it adds a lot to your ability to see the whole fretboard, moving between
positions, understanding how to use things better, getting your fingers used to
different movements....

Google it and "Jack Zucker". He has a web site with some examples from the books.
#7
^^I dunno what that "Huh" means to edg's comment...but just remember scale application is hard. Much harder on guitar then on say piano and the strictly classical violin.

Experiment playing the major/minor up and down in various positions over some backing music in the appropriate key. Since you already have an ear for music, it will be very humbling at first but its about co-ordinating your finger muscle to sounds in your brain.

Also important is to learn licks from solos and websites, books. Look up lessons on melodic control.

EDIT: hey nice examples on that site edge. TraneThang etude is cool. Thanks. Is the entire book worth it?
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Last edited by KryptNet at Mar 23, 2008,
#8
Quote by KryptNet

EDIT: hey nice examples on that site edge. TraneThang etude is cool. Thanks. Is the entire book worth it?


It's my very very favorite best all time ever guitar book!

Get both volumes. I've gotten more new content in my playing from these books
than anything else. It is SO worth it.

I'm not sure if that "huh" was a question or a comment. Whatever....
#9
You might want to slow down since you have to think about using scales you're not used to...
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#10
Quote by tremper6
So I have a relatively broad background in music. I've played violin, trumpet, piano, guitar, etc... I understand how to read music. I understand how scales work, intervals, chords, modes (for the most part although I don't have them memorized or anything...) but I can't seem to apply them. When I improvise while I'm practicing, I always find myself staying in a pentatonic box or something along those lines, and I don't feel like I'm making any progress. I know this wasn't a very specific request, but can anybody help me out? Where do I go from here?!?

Thanks a ****ton


It's very easy to see where your problem is, because you're referring to a scale as a "box". You've no doubt figured out what positions to play certain scales in, but keep in mind that scales are not shapes, fingerings, boxes -- they are not anything except scales. If you learn your notes all over the fretboard, you'll be able to work within the scale without restricting yourself to specific positions.
#11
depends on the genre but I just read ( can't remember where now) a great idea about improvising. It suggested starting with the melody of the song and then modifying that instead of getting too hung up on scales right away. So get a basic melody and play around with it rythmically, adding or subtracting a few notes, changing the phrasing, using different techniques etc. Might help break you out of the scale rut. Hope this helps a bit.