#1
Just finished building my first guitar ever 100% from scratch. It was for a senior project and it really came out great IMO. Sounds very good as well. There's pics of:
1. The truss rod just after installation
2. Applying the first coat of lacquer
3. The basic look of the guitar no hardware or finish yet
4. Good pic of some of the hardware as well as the great shine it has
5. The final product.

Again 100% from scratch down to putting the inlays in the fretboard. Feel free to ask questions.
Attachments:
BOdy and neck.jpg
P3110091.jpg
!!!.jpg
P3050070.jpg
P2090038.jpg
#3
For 100% scratch and a first build that is lovely! What kind of finish? Is it just a clear laquer?
Let me tell you about heartache and the loss of god
Wandering, wandering in hopeless night
Out here in the perimeter there are no stars

Out here we is stoned
Immaculate.
#4
Mr. Rs- I gotta give credit to my dad. he helped quite a bit, but still...

HIghbinder-yup just a clear lacquer
#5
Wow, where did you get the wood?
Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser Deluxe
Boss DS-1
Crate GTD65

GAS List:
Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster
#6
Quote by asfastasdark
Wow, where did you get the wood?



just at a lumber yard surprisingly. its called sapele, very similar to mahogony. the lacquer really brings out the ribbons in it.
#7
looks great
how does it play???
Guitars:
'13 MIM Fender Strat - '05 Epi G-400
Amps:
Fender HRD - VHT Special 6 Ultra -
Jet City JCA20H - Mesa Rectifier 2x12
Pedulz:
Slash Wah - OCD v1.7 - Red Llama MKII -
Big Muff Pi - Carbon Copy - Phase 90 - Ditto Looper
#9
Quote by B. Heath
looks great
how does it play???


after i set the action and intonation just right, it really sounds beautiful. im pleased with how it turned out.
#10
I hate to break it to you, but if you just got that wood at a lumber yard, it will come back to bite you in the ass unless you you spent a good time drying it. The moisture in it could cause it to crack later in life as it dries up, cures, and contracts, along with causing potential finish issues. This can also cause glue to fail over the long term.
#11
Sapele is also called African Mahogany; the woods are similar. Taylor uses it for both sides and backs, and for tops. Ibanez also uses it a lot. An excellent tonewood with a beautiful grain. Great choice. Should sound just dandy.

Now, for your second guitar, you might try breaking out of the Strat straitjacket.

(And CJRocker is correct. If you didn't carefully dry it in climate-controlled conditions for at least two years, it will age rather poorly.)
#12
Quote by CJRocker
I hate to break it to you, but if you just got that wood at a lumber yard, it will come back to bite you in the ass unless you you spent a good time drying it. The moisture in it could cause it to crack later in life as it dries up, cures, and contracts, along with causing potential finish issues. This can also cause glue to fail over the long term.


Edit: just saw the other guys post two years? id say we let it dry for 6 months or so. that sucks
#13
Quote by Ekim423
Edit: just saw the other guys post two years? id say we let it dry for 6 months or so. that sucks

It does, but that having been said, you DID do a nice job on it. Enjoy it while you have it, and work on another with durable hardwoods, and not only will it last longer, you'll probably build it better as it will be your second try

#14
Quote by CJRocker
It does, but that having been said, you DID do a nice job on it. Enjoy it while you have it, and work on another with durable hardwoods, and not only will it last longer, you'll probably build it better as it will be your second try



thanks. we'll see what happens then with this one
#15
Also, it's worthwhile looking into how to get wood to age properly. You can't just stash it in some low-humidity place and not expect it to warp and crack. People who do top quality cabinetry face this same problem. There's lots of material out there...