#1


Hello everyone of
I am trying to of learn my power chords of, yet I have not been able to find many charts of that to make sense of to me.
I modified of one from google of into my own layout of, since it makes more sense of to me, yet I could definetly have an adding of.
The ones on the right of side are chords or notes or something of that I have to of seen in the tabs that I play of, and I have no idea of what are they of.
So to ask of help I am in of this as to of maybe if people who know of what they are of doing to of either maybe of modify this chart or, of easier, just tab out of so I may add to of my chart.
Thank you for any help of =)
#2
xx023x

that's a power chord using the d string, the g string and the b string.

Hhmmm...

and this is another power chord (E)

xx245x OR xx24xx
#4
There are a couple of types of power chords. First of all there is the question whether you want the partial or full (that's what I call it) power chord. Looking at you chart, you want the full. Now there are different positions you can play it in (different string combinations), and when you have one you can slide it up and down the neck to wherever you want and it's still a power chord. They are all identified by the note that is on the lowest string. For example if you play this power chord:
X
6
5
3
X
X
Since the third fret of the D string is an F, this would be called an F power chord.
These are all the different string combinations of power chords:
  • EAD power chord (this particular one, for example, is an E):
    X
    X
    X
    2
    2
    0
  • ADG power chord:
    X
    X
    2
    2
    0
    X
  • DGB power chord:
    X
    3
    2
    0
    X
    X
  • GBE power chord:
    3
    3
    0
    X
    X
    X

Also, your chart is pretty wrong. Only the two left columns are correct, and the power chord on the right marked with a 7 would be what I would call a "partial" power chord.
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Last edited by asfastasdark at Mar 23, 2008,
#5
It's not worth taking the time to "learn" powerchords as a stand-alone entity. All they are is the bottom two or 3 notes of a normal chord, technically the root and 5th with an optional octave. Chord construction follows certain rules, that means if you simply learn how to play chords then you automatically learn how to play powerchords, and when you're learning these things it's a lot easier to reduce a chord down than it is to try and expand on a powerchord.
Actually called Mark!

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#6
why would you need a chart to remember power chords? their pretty damn simple.
If you dont find theory interesting, then DONT study it. IF your TRULY serious about playing guitar(enjoying), then EVENTUALLY you WILL WANT to study it.
#7
Quote by steven seagull
It's not worth taking the time to "learn" powerchords as a stand-alone entity. All they are is the bottom two or 3 notes of a normal chord, technically the root and 5th with an optional octave. Chord construction follows certain rules, that means if you simply learn how to play chords then you automatically learn how to play powerchords, and when you're learning these things it's a lot easier to reduce a chord down than it is to try and expand on a powerchord.


Exactly. Just learn CAGED. It's easy and helps everywhere.
#8
Quote by asfastasdark
There are a couple of types of power chords. First of all there is the question whether you want the partial or full (that's what I call it) power chord.
-shortened-
Also, your chart is pretty wrong. Only the two left columns are correct, and the power chord on the right marked with a 7 would be what I would call a "partial" power chord.


That is what I have of been hearing.
These are just some I have seen in song tabs I have been learning and was just curious.
I also understand the points of learnign guitar theory and such, and have been practicing that, yet also, it is nice to have fun messing aroudn with power chords or such, and since I love of rock type of music, I heard of it was nice to know them.
J Rocker
#9
there aren't different types of powerchord at all - a powerchord is a root and fifth, possibly with an octave.

There only appears to be loads of types if you just look at dots - if you take a little bit of extra trouble to learn why they work you'll save yourself a lot of time in the long run.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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