#1
I just inherited this on the weekend sort of.

It was bought from Allans Music in the CBD and the docket is marked as 1945. So it's 63 years old, yeah!













There is one tuning peg that is bent (shown in picture), and the neck is sort of detaching a few mm from the body. I might need it reset?

Also, I don't know how to install the bridge, or anything like that.

What's the go?
#3
Wouldn't have a clue, the receipt has a pickup date on it (illegible), but it was already paid for.

It was a gift for my grandmother, who was to learn it, but she neglected it and chose to play piano and sing instead.
#4
Aaargh, the most feared of all instruments.. a Manjo!! (That's really what people call them over here)

Definitely save it! New tuners can be had for relatively little money. Just replace both the sets and I'm pretty sure you glue the bridge piece on the 'skin' part but I'm not 100% sure how you find the right placing etc for the intonation and stuff to be correct.

I would seriously say get a luthier to look it over, especially about the neck, and get it fixed up. Since you inherited it for free it can't be so bad to spend a little money getting it fixed properly. Then either learn to play it now, or save it to learn to play later and pass it on to your grandkids one day.

Mandolin is a really fun instrument to learn, I've recently learned some songs on it (irish reels) and it's great fun to show off to people.

So yeah, get it fixed up properly and start twanging away at some traditional folk music or start working up your bluegrass chops.
#5
The bridge is what is called a floating bridge so basically you just put it on the head of the thing before the strings are thight then after you thighten the strings a bit you move it around untill you get your intonation right.

The tuning pegs do need replaced but should be cheap to do. The only simi expensive part of fixing that up will be the neck reset which might not be that expensive at all (i've never reset a neck on one of those so I don't know) so it's worth taking it to a luthier and seeing what they tell you.
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#6
Cheers, I've sussed out a banjo player at a music shop my friend works at.
He used to build guitars for Maton so he should be able to help me.

SHOULD, haha.
Faith!
#7
Quote by CorduroyEW
The bridge is what is called a floating bridge so basically you just put it on the head of the thing before the strings are thight then after you thighten the strings a bit you move it around untill you get your intonation right.

The tuning pegs do need replaced but should be cheap to do. The only simi expensive part of fixing that up will be the neck reset which might not be that expensive at all (i've never reset a neck on one of those so I don't know) so it's worth taking it to a luthier and seeing what they tell you.

Personally, I'd keep the tuners. They don't need to be replaced; the peg can be bent back safely.

The bridge is a floating bridge; it is propped up underneath the strings and rests against the head. The wider slots are obviously for the thicker strings. Measure the distance from the nut to the 12th fret, then take that distance from the 12th fret and onto the head. This gives you the ballpark for the correct placement of the bridge. Minor adjustments will be needed for setting intonation correctly.

I would have the neck reset. The whole thing will be setup if you have the neck reset, so you might as well wait before propping up the bridge. I can say with some degree of certainty that it will be worth having a neck reset.
Sincerely, Chad.
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