#1
Hey everybody - I have just joined, this is my first post.

I am in somewhat urgent need of help - I am desperate to hone an advanced alternating picking technique so I can replicate the playing of my hero John Mclaughlin. If you listen to his playing with the guitar trio you can hear that he is capable of playing incredibly quickly on a nylon string guitar, using a plectrum.
However I am finding that the thickness of my guitar strings (I use nylon - of standard tension, 0.09 -0.42) is too great for me to be able to cut through them efficiently, and am having great difficulty doing anything approaching fast alternating picking as a result. My hand just flies about everwhere and I can't keep it steady.

So: is there a lighter set of strings I could use, or ones of different tension? I don't have a thorough knowledge of the different trypes of strings available and so am a bit lost. Does anyone know what strings Mclaughlin uses himself, or does anyone have their own particular preferences on the matter?
#2
Unfortunately, the way he can play that way is the fact the he practiced several hours a day for many years. There is no shortcut, no matter what people tell you. You just have to practice slowly with a metronome and build up speed. Anybody that tells you otherwise is completely full of it or plays uncleanly.
#3
Hi, Fan

have you got a low action guitar ?.
What I'm trying to say is have you checked that the action of your guitar suits You.

Get some songs that has some fast movement but not the whole piece fast,
then practice the fast part on its own. If you need some kind of music let me know, or use the Guitar Ultimate here and then the Guitar pro.

I'm currently practicing the Manha the Carnival (Black Forrest) and the Guitar concert Jaquin Rodriguez.

Speed can also be accomplished by some run of scales.

Cooledit
#4
Quote by cooledit
Hi, Fan

have you got a low action guitar ?.
What I'm trying to say is have you checked that the action of your guitar suits You.

Get some songs that has some fast movement but not the whole piece fast,
then practice the fast part on its own. If you need some kind of music let me know, or use the Guitar Ultimate here and then the Guitar pro.

I'm currently practicing the Manha the Carnival (Black Forrest) and the Guitar concert Jaquin Rodriguez.

Speed can also be accomplished by some run of scales.

Cooledit


At the moment I'm using a book called "Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar" by Troy Stetina, in which there are a variety of excercises for building up speed. The book was however written with the elecrtic guitar in mind, so all I can do is try to apply certain ideas to the acoustic guitar. I haven't been able to find any book advising on how to approach that style of playing on the acoustic guitar anywhere, and hence am experiencing some difficulties trying to develop the technique. I was considering looking into this DVD by Mclaughlin called "This is the Way I Do It" for further insight.
I once tried to forcibly lower the action on my guitar by filing down the action - but it didn't make any difference...
Any advice/recommendations are much appreciated !
#5
Quote by Mahavishnu Fan
At the moment I'm using a book called "Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar" by Troy Stetina, in which there are a variety of excercises for building up speed. The book was however written with the elecrtic guitar in mind, so all I can do is try to apply certain ideas to the acoustic guitar. I haven't been able to find any book advising on how to approach that style of playing on the acoustic guitar anywhere, and hence am experiencing some difficulties trying to develop the technique. I was considering looking into this DVD by Mclaughlin called "This is the Way I Do It" for further insight.
I once tried to forcibly lower the action on my guitar by filing down the action - but it didn't make any difference...
Any advice/recommendations are much appreciated !


This is the way I do it, while certainly an excellent instruction, is more about note choice/phrasing in improv than pure technique.