#1
I've been struggling to understand time signatures, but I think I understand it now.

So the numerator is the number of beats per measure, and the denominator is the kind of note (whole, half, etc.). One quarter note equals one beat, one half note equals two beats, etc. Measures are there to divide the music up into manageable sections and to show where to accent certain notes, but are otherwise unimportant (e.g. if you don't accent notes, 3/4 is the same as 4/4).

Is that it? Do I have it correct?
What I Play
70% classic rock, 20% metal, 10% blues

Guitar
Fender Highway One Stratocaster - SSS

Amplifier
Line 6 Spider III 15

Pedals
Vox V-847A Wah
#2
C = common time


4/4 = there are four beats per measure, one beat in each measure is
equivalent to a quarter note

3/4 = 2 beats per measure, each note still ='s a quarter note

6/8 = 6 beats per measure. notice the eight as denominator, that means each beat would be an eight note. (quarter = 2 beats, half note, 4 beats etc..)


Hoped that Helped
#3
In 3/4 time there are 3 beats per measure isnt it?

2/4 has 2 quarter notes per measure
Matt: it wouldnt really be a gainer since ur just going straight up
Me: i'm going over the spine
Matt: yea i know spine transfer
Me: frontflips > backflips
Matt: or in ur case it could be called broken spine transfer if you fall hard
#6
Basically the definition of a Time Signature, the Denominator tells you what kind of note it is

X/2 means there's half notes

X/4 means there's quarter notes

X/ 8 means theres eight notes

X/16.. *I guess* means there's 16 notes etc.

The numerator tells you how many of that particular type of note is in each measure

4/X means there 4 of what ever type of beat in each measure

3/X means theres 3 of what ever type of beat in each measure

et.
Matt: it wouldnt really be a gainer since ur just going straight up
Me: i'm going over the spine
Matt: yea i know spine transfer
Me: frontflips > backflips
Matt: or in ur case it could be called broken spine transfer if you fall hard
#7
But the number of beats per measure doesn't change anything except the accented notes, correct?
What I Play
70% classic rock, 20% metal, 10% blues

Guitar
Fender Highway One Stratocaster - SSS

Amplifier
Line 6 Spider III 15

Pedals
Vox V-847A Wah
#9
Quote by ColCommunism
But the number of beats per measure doesn't change anything except the accented notes, correct?


Changes your downbeat.
#10
you'd have to get yourself a simple music book, there are so many little details and exeptions,but once you get the basics, its not overly complicated, i find. (Y)
#11
Quote by Time Seller
Listen to Meshuggah. They throw your sense of time signatures right out the bloody window.


15/11 to 17/16 to 13/8 with 4 different polyrhythms over it. I bow.