#1
so im starting a work out for playing. to work on many aspects of playing.

so far i have this.

15min- warm up (chromatics)
15min- scale work (scale paterns/positions)
15min- chord work
15min- picking (alt-econ-mix)

30 break

15min-warm up again
15min- sweep picking
15min- tapping
15min- string skipping

30 break

15min- warm up once again
15min- legato
15min- phraseing
15min- improve.

done.

is there anything else you guys can add to my list.

thanks.
#3
ok, forgot to mention this is for technique only. this isnt all im goin to be playing. this is just to get my tech up past were i am and be able to play cleaner.
#4
I never liked breaking technique exercises up so much. I do like strict technique practice for building chops in the least time possible, and for time constrained people, but redundancy sucks. Don't waste time doing the same thing over and over, and calling it something else.

First of all, I don't see why you'd need to warm up three times, I'm usually loosened up after one warm up, and stay that way for a while.

Scale work could be combined with legato, as well as with picking, tapping, and string skipping. Chromatics are nice to use, but I think using a scale with those techniques will give you a better toolbox to use when you need to improv, I like to use chromatics as an extension of my scales when I improv, but that's my own preference.

I don't really see why you're allotting 15 minutes to improve, you're improving the entire time you practice. Unless you mean improv, in which case that's the best place to put it; but it seems to me that phrasing falls in the same category.

You could work some chord work in with scales and sweeping, it won't be as smooth or straightforward, but it would build lots of connections and correlations if you don't already have them.

Hate to be more destructive than constructive. You do have a solid routine, but it seems somewhat redundant, and really long. You gotta ask yourself if you're really gonna want to sit down and do a 4 hour practice a day. There's no doubt in my mind you'd improve with this routine, but I do have doubts on how well this schedule will fit the rest of your life, simply because it's long.

I'd still say play some music, it may not seem technical, but it really is. One thing I learned from doing strict tech drills last summer was that you need to connect them. That's why I combine several areas into one. If you aren't very focused you'll build skills that won't mesh, because you'll get better at the drill, not the technique.
Livin' Easy, Livin' Free
#7
Quote by GuitarFreak1387
so im starting a work out for playing. to work on many aspects of playing.

so far i have this.

15min- warm up (chromatics)
15min- scale work (scale paterns/positions)
15min- chord work
15min- picking (alt-econ-mix)

30 break

15min-warm up again
15min- sweep picking
15min- tapping
15min- string skipping

30 break

15min- warm up once again
15min- legato
15min- phraseing
15min- improve.

done.

is there anything else you guys can add to my list.

thanks.


4 hours workout? Dude.

Cut down the 15 mins to 5 mins/10 mins depending how much time you have. And cut the 30 mins break to 5 mins.
#8
get all this down to one hour and find someone who plays decent rhythm and spend two hours jamming new stuff with all the techniques you practice, you'll gett much better inn no time at all.(may take actual time.)


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#9
30 min breaks work against you IMO...itll take away from all of your warmup.

after each break youll be playing almost cold again.

you dont need to focus on these kinds of crazy routineslol....theyll only wear you out and make the guitar feel like work.

Paul gilbert and almost anyone who has any interviews and is great with vids etc...ALWAYS shows patterns and stuff that he came up with for himself but that he then added into his playing and songs he wrote.

i mean im all about practicing for hours, but practicing songs that you enjoy and include the techniques that need work for you is your best bet. Not repetitive chromatics etc.
Jackson KV2 USA Snow White/Black Bevels
#10
i do it like this:


30 minutes of warming up (streches, difernet exercises for whrist movement...)
2 hours of alternate picking
2 hours of sweeping
1hour of legato
2hours of tapping
1hour of improvisation
30minutes of cooling down

basicly the warming up and the impro/cooling down is always the same!
#11
Quote by torturer6067
i do it like this:


30 minutes of warming up (streches, difernet exercises for whrist movement...)
2 hours of alternate picking
2 hours of sweeping
1hour of legato
2hours of tapping
1hour of improvisation
30minutes of cooling down

basicly the warming up and the impro/cooling down is always the same!


Do you have a life!?

I practice whenever I can. Damn school. When I do, it's not regimented. I usually just jam with my dad's drum students that are always over here, then when they're gone I grind my metronome until I get hungry or something. Whatever.
#12
Quote by Avedas
Do you have a life!?

I practice whenever I can. Damn school. When I do, it's not regimented. I usually just jam with my dad's drum students that are always over here, then when they're gone I grind my metronome until I get hungry or something. Whatever.



sure i have a life! i get stoned every day after the practicing! i go out over weekends and i get drunk constantantly and i abuse drugs! but during the week i try to practice between 4,5 hours when im lazy and 7,8,9 when i have the will to practice
#13
Blah, I was never the type to use a schedule for anything.

I just pick up my guitar, do some terror death licks, and i'm ready for action.
hue
#14
Guitarists spend too much time making practice routines and never getting anything done.


7 or 8 hours a day is going to get you injured and fast.

You shouldn't do all that practising in a row. It's like working out with your body in a gym. Ever heard of anyone that does it straight for 4 hours with only 30 minute breaks that expects to never become injured? I haven't.

I never liked breaking technique exercises up so much. I do like strict technique practice for building chops in the least time possible, and for time constrained people, but redundancy sucks. Don't waste time doing the same thing over and over, and calling it something else.

First of all, I don't see why you'd need to warm up three times, I'm usually loosened up after one warm up, and stay that way for a while.

Scale work could be combined with legato, as well as with picking, tapping, and string skipping. Chromatics are nice to use, but I think using a scale with those techniques will give you a better toolbox to use when you need to improv, I like to use chromatics as an extension of my scales when I improv, but that's my own preference.

I don't really see why you're allotting 15 minutes to improve, you're improving the entire time you practice. Unless you mean improv, in which case that's the best place to put it; but it seems to me that phrasing falls in the same category.

You could work some chord work in with scales and sweeping, it won't be as smooth or straightforward, but it would build lots of connections and correlations if you don't already have them.

Hate to be more destructive than constructive. You do have a solid routine, but it seems somewhat redundant, and really long. You gotta ask yourself if you're really gonna want to sit down and do a 4 hour practice a day. There's no doubt in my mind you'd improve with this routine, but I do have doubts on how well this schedule will fit the rest of your life, simply because it's long.

I'd still say play some music, it may not seem technical, but it really is. One thing I learned from doing strict tech drills last summer was that you need to connect them. That's why I combine several areas into one. If you aren't very focused you'll build skills that won't mesh, because you'll get better at the drill, not the technique.


Good post. Listen to that guy.


I play classical guitar and go to the conservatory and I was doing 2 hours of practice a day. I went to a jazz course and played for about 5 or 6 a day. Now I'm injured and I can't play my guitar without my arm tiring straight away followed by bad stiffness and pain. I have to go to the doctor now so he can tell me wtf I've done to my arm and how long before I can play again. You're going to land up the same if you suddenly make such a huge jump in practice time, especially when it's intensive and solely technique. You're going to tire out your muscles and they'll start cramping and aching.


I don't want to sound like I'm putting you down but you're much better off doing varied practice, for maybe and hour or an hour and a half a day well done, concentrated, making sure you don't make any strange movements or pick up any bad habits than 4 hours of tiring and not very productive practice.