#1
Please tell me if what i've been doing is right:

Step 1: Write out the notes of all the chords in a line.

Step 2: Find the highest sharp or flat (by highest i mean nearest the middle in the "FCGDAEB" thing, don't know what it's called)

Step 3: Find the chord that contains those sharps/flats (i know the amounts of most scales)

Step 4: Use relative minor if i want it to sound minor.

Is this right?
And if a progression is in Cmajor can i use C dorian to get a different sound?

PS. If you don't get the FCGDAEB thing tell me and i'll try and explain it more clearly.
Last edited by 12345abcd3 at Mar 25, 2008,
#4
Yes, they are technically the same key, but D dorian is a different mode. If you were going to add a lead line over the C major chord progression, the idea would be to start and end on the D note to give the song a different feel so to speak..
#5
Ok thanks flyman, its just that in another thread somebody said even if you started and ended on D the mode would be defined by the scales.

Also, what scale would i use over just C and Am because Am isn't working very well.
#6
hmmm, well modes can be quite confusing. As far as I know, I'm right but I could be wrong.. It'd be worth searching the web for lessons on modes, just to double check what I've said is right or not..
#7
Oh no oh no oh no.... just wait til the mode police get here!!!

'Using' D Dorian over c major will NOT give a Dorian sound, it will give a C Major sound.

If you have a progression in C major, you wont be able to 'make it' C Dorian.
A C Dorian progression must be built using C Dorian (b3 and b7).

It is all about the resolution/tonal centre.... If your progression resolves to the 1st degree, it will be major, regardless of what you play. If it resolves to the 6th degree (of the major scale) it will be minor.

If you are REALLY clever and can make something resolve to a different degree (probably 2 chords max) then it can be modal.
#9
Quote by 12345abcd3
Please tell me if what i've been doing is right:



I'm not sure what it is your doing, but it sure doesn't look right.
It's not as simple as working out some formula based on a chord soup.
You have to look at what the chords are actually DOing.

The first step is figuring out the tonic chord. That's where all the other chords
will seem to lead to and come to "rest" on. Frequently it's the first or last chord,
but sometimes not. Sometimes the tonic chord changes through the progression.
Sometimes the change is only implied or brief, sometimes it takes a whole section.

So, that's where you'd start. From finding the tonic everything else follows.
Sometimes the "everything else" can be up to more interpretation, sometimes it's
more straightforward.

So, you have to analyze the chords to figure out the scale. That analysis is based
on major scale harmony at least for starters.
#10
Quote by 12345abcd3
Please tell me if what i've been doing is right:

Step 1: Write out the notes of all the chords in a line.

Step 2: Find the highest sharp or flat (by highest i mean nearest the middle in the "FCGDAEB" thing, don't know what it's called)

Step 3: Find the chord that contains those sharps/flats (i know the amounts of most scales)

Step 4: Use relative minor if i want it to sound minor.

Is this right?
And if a progression is in Cmajor can i use C dorian to get a different sound?

PS. If you don't get the FCGDAEB thing tell me and i'll try and explain it more clearly.


You can't use a C dorian scale over a Cmajor progression. You can't use D dorian either.. whoever said that has no idea what they're doing.
#11
Quote by ouchies
You can't use a C dorian scale over a Cmajor progression. You can't use D dorian either.. whoever said that has no idea what they're doing.



it really doesnt sound like you know what your talking about either.
#13
Please don't elaborate

There are different ways of viewing modes... there are thousands of books that teach the 'one mode per chord' method, where if there is a piece in C major, the second chord will be Dorian.... and i can't see many reasons why people are so against this.
BUT the more correct way of viewing modes is to NOT VIEW THEM AT ALL in key based music, whereby songs are judged by their tonal centres only.

This is the reason Ouchies said 'You can't use D Dorian either'.

In truth, you CAN use D Dorian, however you will be playing C major, because the tonal centre of a C chord is.................. C. Therefore the ear 'hears' the intervals relative to C.
#14
Quote by branny1982
In truth, you CAN use D Dorian, however you will be playing C major, because the tonal centre of a C chord is.................. C. Therefore the ear 'hears' the intervals relative to C.


If the chord progression is not suggesting D Dorian, you're not playing D Dorian. You cannot play D Dorian over a C major progression.