#1
So I know the pentatonic major and minor and blues scales in every position for every note on the fretboard, but I want to expand my playing with modes. To do this I need to know the natural major and minor scales, as that is what they're built off of. I know the formula for making hte major and minor scales (WWHWWWH and WHWWHWW), and so I can play them all in one position. My question is, how do I play them in multiple positions? like going down the fretboard, are there 'patterns' ( i know scales arent patterns, but intervals) like the pentatonic major and minor that I can memorize so I can just move them up and down chromatically in key?
#2
Patterns as in what?

If I think I know what your talking about your talking about the "boxes" or 3 shapes that form ALL major scales. That?
#3
ya I am talking about boxes that form the scales, but in all positions, so i can get some variety of sound when I solo.
#4
Yah I know what your talking about, let me see if I can find it online, as of right now I only have it in my theory book, give me a few.
#6
Okay i found what you need, apparently it had a name the whole time except my theory book is around 20 years old XD.


Look up the C-A-G-E-D system that should be exactly what you're looking for.
#10
well what i found is the CAGED system of chords, which i dont think is the same. I dont really understand it though, it talks about how moving an open C to the 4th fret makes it an E chord, moving G to the 2nd fret makes it A, and movind D to the 3rd fret makes it F (all of these chords are major). I am failing to see how this relates to scales though.
#11
hmm maybe I have mistaking on what I thought the CAGED system was.

Let me do a little more diggin.
#13
Well, I can't find it online. Idk if it's outdated because this book is from 1979 or what. But I can explain the boxes to you.


Go to www.all-guitar-chords.com

look at the top and click guitar scales.

Click Full then click A then Major, then hit go.

Now there are 3 shapes we can indentify here.
I label them A B C because thats what the book has them as.

A: All notes on frets 1-5
B: All notes on frets 6-10
C: All notes on frets 9-12

After C, it repeats back to A at fret 13 aka fret 1 as well.

B and C overlap in the middle of each other.

These 3 shapes show up in ALL major scales, so if you learn these 3 shapes you know every major scale, ALL over the neck.

To see how this works I will provide an example.

Click Full then click D then Major, then hit go.

Can you find the shapes?

Although in a different order, they are still there.

A: All notes on frets 6-10
B: All notes on frets 11-15 aka 11-3 (fret 15 is the same note as fret 3)
C: All notes on frets 2-5

All you do to get the next Major Scale is take one of the shapes (A being the easiest imo because it has the one note sticking out in the front) and move it 7 FRETS up, or down if you want the major scale before the one you're one.

So look at your D major, look at the 6th fret, that C# there, take your finger and count up 7 frets to the right.

Your on Fret 13 aka Fret 1

Click Full then click A then Major, then hit go.

Would you look at that, that single note from the A shape is RIGHT where your finger landed.


I hope this explaination has made sense, I understand it's harder to understand not being able to actually see the boxes drawn.

Msg on here or feel free to PM me if you still don't understand.
#14
Quote by Guitarfreak777
Well, I can't find it online. Idk if it's outdated because this book is from 1979 or what. But I can explain the boxes to you.


Go to www.all-guitar-chords.com

look at the top and click guitar scales.

Click Full then click A then Major, then hit go.

Now there are 3 shapes we can indentify here.
I label them A B C because thats what the book has them as.

A: All notes on frets 1-5
B: All notes on frets 6-10
C: All notes on frets 9-12

After C, it repeats back to A at fret 13 aka fret 1 as well.

B and C overlap in the middle of each other.

These 3 shapes show up in ALL major scales, so if you learn these 3 shapes you know every major scale, ALL over the neck.

To see how this works I will provide an example.

Click Full then click D then Major, then hit go.

Can you find the shapes?

Although in a different order, they are still there.

A: All notes on frets 6-10
B: All notes on frets 11-15 aka 11-3 (fret 15 is the same note as fret 3)
C: All notes on frets 2-5

All you do to get the next Major Scale is take one of the shapes (A being the easiest imo because it has the one note sticking out in the front) and move it 7 FRETS up, or down if you want the major scale before the one you're one.

So look at your D major, look at the 6th fret, that C# there, take your finger and count up 7 frets to the right.

Your on Fret 13 aka Fret 1

Click Full then click A then Major, then hit go.

Would you look at that, that single note from the A shape is RIGHT where your finger landed.


I hope this explaination has made sense, I understand it's harder to understand not being able to actually see the boxes drawn.

Msg on here or feel free to PM me if you still don't understand.


But the scale is not a shape. The scale is the intervals: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. Which in the case of D major is : D, E, F#, G, A, B, C#.

Typically when people practice their scales they play it ascending and then descending in one octave, from root to octave, with the notes arranged in numerical order according to Hz.

This is NOT the only way to play them. One can play the notes in ANY ORDER anywhere on the fret board, using any techniques.
#15
Quote by Guitarfreak777
*wall of text*


That's much harder than telling someone A Minor, B Locrian, C Major, D Dorian, and E Phrygian sound the same because they're the same notes.
#17
Quote by :-D
If you know your notes all across the fretboard as well as your scale construction, this won't be a problem.


i just realized that. WWHWWWH and WHWWHWW.

strings:
E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D D# E
A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G# A
D D# E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D
G G# A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G
B C C# D D# E F F# G G# A A# B
E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D D# E

so i am all good
#19
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
The minor scale is really a mode of the major scale itsself. Just start with the major scale alone


What this man says is true. All my solos, I just take the relative major of the song, and solo in it.
I'm back. No-one knew I left anyway. Do you even know who I am?
#20
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
The minor scale is really a mode of the major scale itsself. Just start with the major scale alone


Aeolian is a mode of the major scale, but "minor" as a tonality is completely different and has nothing to do with modes whatsoever.

All my solos, I just take the relative major of the song, and solo in it.


You're not soloing in the "relative major". Scales are not positions.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Apr 5, 2008,
#21
Quote by Slashfan_666
What this man says is true. All my solos, I just take the relative major of the song, and solo in it.
Ofcourse you wouldnt know why a m6 sounds eastern over a dominant chord, or why a passing b5 sounds cool over a minor chord, nor would you care...

I hate that mentality, "I'll just play completely random notes in 1 scale and nothing else matters." It really slows a musicians creativity and limits their innovations.
#22
Quote by Slashfan_666
What this man says is true. All my solos, I just take the relative major of the song, and solo in it.

If the song is in B minor for example, you're soloing in B minor, not D major. Learn what you're talking about.