#1
Ok......... so I recently started gigging with my band,
but we're having huge problems with our sound setup.

We mic all three of our amps, (two guitars, one bass)
and there is just way to much feedback from all the mics.
To try and solve the problem I started looking at direct boxes so we could
plug straight into the mix, hopefully eliminating all the noise.

One problem, none of us have any experience with direct boxes, so I wanted
to get some advice on which boxes to buy, or if we shouldn't buy them at all.

Is the "Behringer Ultra-G GI100 DI" any good?
It's cheap($35 I think), and has a 4x12 cab simulator.

I have a "Peavy Jsx head"/"6505 cab",
the bass player has a "Fender Rumble 60 Bass Combo Amp",
and the lead singer has a "Line6 Spider III 75 Combo"( I know, we're trying to help him find a better amp)

We play all kinds of rock, so I can't really tell you any specific style....
but its a lot of classic rock and metal.
Please try to keep the price around $100, but if the only decent ones are more expensive then I guess we'll have to spend more money.

Any suggestions would be appreciated!
#2
Direct boxes sound horrible with most amps. I would just plug in the bass player, and find an angle for the speakers so they don't feedback with the mics as much. But, what kind of mics are you using?
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cowdude speaks words of infinite wisdomery.
#3
We're using Shure SM57 mics, so I don't think they're
the problem for the two guitars.
I guess we'll keep working with the angles to try and get a good setup.

But the bass just fuzzes A LOT when he turns his
amp up and plays through the mic.
Would it be better to use a direct box, or could a kick drum mic handle the bass better than the SM75?
#4
I would use a direct box on the output of the bass player's amp. Also, you might wanna fiddle with the EQ on the mixer until you get the optimum sound that you are looking for. PA speakers can't usually handle the giant low end that a bass puts out, so scooping out some of the low end and low mids can usually solve a fuzzy problem such as the one your having.

Good Luck!
Quote by thrilla13w
The hotbar should be floating parallel to the principle axis at this point. Next, take a hammer, and beat yourself in the face while crying JIHAD. problem fixed.

Quote by Slaytanic1993
cowdude speaks words of infinite wisdomery.
#6
Quote by smb
Why don't you just reduce your on-stage volume?


This guy knows his stuff. Turn down on stage. If you're mic'ing up, your amps should be no more than monitors for you, if you have monitors infront of you, then only your drummer needs to hear them. And if he's got a monitor then even he doesn't need to. If you're mic;ing they only need to be loud enough to give the desk a good signal. Turn down on stage.

SM57s on the guitars are a good choice. With the bass amp, take the line out, or pre amp signal into a DI box and take that into the mixer. This will give you the best sound you're gonna get. If you're putting the guitars through the PA, you may also want to think heavily about putting the kit through the PA to - for a general balance. A kick drum mic, snare mic and 2 overheads - one over the Ride/floor tom and one over the crash/hi-hat/snare area will give you/your engineer a good enough idea of the kit to work with.
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you can get that toneblaster stack at the cost of your dignity.

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#7
wow, thanks for the responses.
Any idea which direct box we should use for the bass?


I don't think our drummer needs to be mic'ed, he's way too loud as it is.
We play mostly small/medium size clubs, so he wont need to mic till we get some bigger venues.
But he does mic his cymbals, cause they tend to get lost in all the noise.

Again, thanks for all the help