#1
I made a thread before asking about locking tuners... I'm pretty much set on getting them, but I'm looking for a way to fix my current tuning problems, without having to buy anything.

My high e, B, and sometimes the G are going out of tune like crazy on my new Strat. Even just the slightest bend is putting the B out, and a few bends will put out the e, and occasionally the G. I'm scared to even touch the tremolo now...

I've restrung these strings, and the problem isn't as big now, but it's still bugging me. When I touch the B, I can a noise which sounds like the string slipping at the tuner. I know I put the string on right, and it's stretched out. What could this problem be?

EDIT: The E A and D strings are staying in tune perfectly, even when I mess with the tremolo.
#2
could be strings binding in the nut. (poorly cut, or you're using too alrge a gauge for what it's cut for)

could be strings slipping out of the tuning posts (if you haven't strung them up securely, I uaully use a lock wrap) This problem would be more evident on the palin strings as they're smoother and create less friction.

could be the spring on that side of the trem isn't adjusted to fully compensate for the strign tension when you use it.

could be the strings are binding up under the string tree.
#3
Quote by Hydra26
could be strings binding in the nut. (poorly cut, or you're using too alrge a gauge for what it's cut for)

could be strings slipping out of the tuning posts (if you haven't strung them up securely, I uaully use a lock wrap) This problem would be more evident on the palin strings as they're smoother and create less friction.

could be the spring on that side of the trem isn't adjusted to fully compensate for the strign tension when you use it.

could be the strings are binding up under the string tree.


I'm using 10 gauge strings, so I don't think the nut isn't cut big enough for it. They seem to be in it fine. I even put a little bit of graphite in the nut, since I've heard that helps. The strings were doing this before I changed them, then I put on some new ones, and it's still doing it. I doubt I'm putting them on wrong, cause I never had this problem with my SG.

Today I put the bridge level to the body (added a spring), and haven't used the tremolo arm at all (I took it out.). The B string is still going out of tune like mad, even when I don't bend on it. It's driving me crazy, because I can't even get through a whole song without the thing going out of tune. The E and G seem to be fine now, it's just that damned B. Is there any other problems that could be occurring?

EDIT: There's a set of Grover tuners on a cheap washburn guitar I have lying around... would they be better than the Fender tuners? Should I switch them up, or would it be a waste? I'll be buying locking tuners once I have the cash.
Last edited by AngelOfHatred at Mar 27, 2008,
#4
If they're going sharp rather than flat I'd say your tremolo is probaly not balanced right, but more likely they're going flat. Honestly it could be a lot of things. Drastic temperature/humidity changes, slippage to add to the common problems I listed above. Stretch the strings some more. Couldn't hurt.

f they're fine open but out of tune when fretted, your intonation might be off or your action too high.
#5
Quote by Hydra26
If they're going sharp rather than flat I'd say your tremolo is probaly not balanced right, but more likely they're going flat. Honestly it could be a lot of things. Drastic temperature/humidity changes, slippage to add to the common problems I listed above. Stretch the strings some more. Couldn't hurt.

f they're fine open but out of tune when fretted, your intonation might be off or your action too high.


They go sharp sometimes, and sometimes they go flat. So it could be the tremolo isn't balance right? How can I fix that? It's floating slightly off the body. Only a bit.

It's the open B being out of tune, not fretted notes. I adjusted the intonation the day I got the guitar.
#6
wel it's probably your trem or drastic temp changes then. make sure the strings are nice and stretched out, then you adjust the claw in the back of the gutiar with a screwdriver (more or less counter-tension on the bridge) until it balances when the guitar has been sitting at a normal temperature. When you go from warm house to cold car or vice versa with it, you want to allow some time to let the instrument get back to room temperature. I don't use trem guitars much, so you probably want to do some reading online. That's really all I got.
#7
Quote by Hydra26
wel it's probably your trem or drastic temp changes then. make sure the strings are nice and stretched out, then you adjust the claw in the back of the gutiar with a screwdriver (more or less counter-tension on the bridge) until it balances when the guitar has been sitting at a normal temperature. When you go from warm house to cold car or vice versa with it, you want to allow some time to let the instrument get back to room temperature. I don't use trem guitars much, so you probably want to do some reading online. That's really all I got.


People say that Strat trems can float off the body a bit, though. And wouldn't it affect all of the strings, not just one?

I guess I'll take my guitar down to the local shop this weekend, cause I can't find a good explanation for this problem...