#1
hey, my friend and I were talking about how to construct a good backing to an amatuer rap client(he's an engineer)

I guess East Coast Style? I thought Wu Tang Clan but he told me they might be out of style? So inspiration for the non-generic but still stylistically strong beat?

Will be engineered with ProTools/Reason rig. ANY opinions appreciated. thx
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#2
^ first things first. you want some good softsynth patches. personally i recommend fruity loops for the basics and getting some plugins (like a buttload of them) and playing with them (but obviously anything with a midi composer/recorder will work, i just like the click n play ability of FL). a lot of the differences in electronic music is how the music is eq'ed. note that hip hop/rap uses a boosted sub bass and has the bass range boosted as well. there is an affinity for natural instruments such as piano, violin. as for synth just make sure you have some good patches. i'm not sure what exactly you're needing but hopefully this helps. if you have any more specific questions let me know and i'll help you the best i can.
#3
^Worry more about samples than synths tbh

Stock up on your jazz and funk records. It ain't hiphop if it ain't got samples. Don't try to tell me you don't wanna use samples "cuz itz ilegul n steelin". A) it has no right to be illegal, trust me I just did a research paper on this , and B) its not stealing, its re appropriating and often paying tribute to.
Of course, jazz and funk isn't necessary, sample whatever you feel would work. Just remember to thank the record when you're done

I got some nice beats under the name The Illustrated Man at www.myspace.com/theillustratedman808

PM me if you need help, or my AIM handle is amishdawg808
Last edited by MastaBassist10 at Mar 25, 2008,
#4
^yeah sampling is a must in the Hip-Hop business. Find a drum beat, a cool sample from a record, add or record your own bassline, and flow over it. check out mastabassists stuff, its really good. heres mine if you want more ideas http://artists.ultimate-guitar.com/sigurdrings/
Quote by allislost
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#5
Quote by MastaBassist10
Don't try to tell me you don't wanna use samples "cuz itz ilegul n steelin". A) it has no right to be illegal, trust me I just did a research paper on this


What the f*ck are you on about? The illegality of sampling is there so that the original artists have the right to refuse inappropriate use of what they have created. It also provides the original composer to get paid for something they put the work into.
Do you not believe that the writer should get some credit?

I'm not arguing that sampling is wrong, its a great tool, but I really don't like it when people take the credit for what others have actually done. They don't deserve to be congratulated for running Fruity Loops in the background or doing a few snaps of the fingers if the main focus is on what someone else has made.
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#6
^very few artists sample stuff that was top of the charts and everyone already knows (Kanye comes to mind), I agree, that's pretty tasteless, But the jazz and funk that mastabassist is probably talking about is usually much harder to pick out, and if you hear a well made hip-hop record, it's very difficult to pick stuff out, 'cause they usually sample some obscure ****, and yes those artists a)get credit for it b)get money for it or c)don't let them use it. Yeah, that was one sentence.
Quote by allislost
I would say that aetherspear speaks nothing but the truth.
UG Blues Group
UG Reggae & Dub Group
Need Professional Mixing for cheap? Need Vinyl to Digital Transfers? PM Me.
#7
Quote by Andrewbiles
What the f*ck are you on about? The illegality of sampling is there so that the original artists have the right to refuse inappropriate use of what they have created. It also provides the original composer to get paid for something they put the work into.
Do you not believe that the writer should get some credit?

I'm not arguing that sampling is wrong, its a great tool, but I really don't like it when people take the credit for what others have actually done. They don't deserve to be congratulated for running Fruity Loops in the background or doing a few snaps of the fingers if the main focus is on what someone else has made.
The Fair Use Doctrine actually makes this practice not fall under copyright infringement. I can post the section on the Doctrine if you like. [Edited because I sounded like an ass there, sorry]

And of course I think the original artist should get credit, that's part of "thanking the record"
Whether or not I would willingly let a casual listener (as opposed to a legal body or even the original artist) know the sample source is tricky. I want to give credit where it's due, but I think, at least for me, knowing the source ruins the tune, the same way as knowing how a guitar tone or a bassline or a really neat production technique is pulled off. I like the mystery, as it adds to the magic of the piece. Disagree as you like.
#8
It may have originally fallen under the fair use agreement, but, "[after the case of Grand Upright Music, Ltd. v. Warner Bros. Records, Inc] samples now had to be licensed, as long as they rose 'to a level of legally cognizable appropriation'". So basically if you can recognise a sample in a song and are planning to sell it and make money out of it you have to get a licence to use it.

I see where you're coming from about not wanting to say that you've sampled Slipknot (as an example) or something in a CD booklet or on a website, and I don't believe that in every situation you do have to credit them in written form on a release, from what I've always understood you can in some situations just pay but you do have to inform them before you begin to sell the song.

Quote by aetherspear
^very few artists sample stuff that was top of the charts and everyone already knows (Kanye comes to mind), I agree, that's pretty tasteless, But the jazz and funk that mastabassist is probably talking about is usually much harder to pick out, and if you hear a well made hip-hop record, it's very difficult to pick stuff out, 'cause they usually sample some obscure ****, and yes those artists a)get credit for it b)get money for it or c)don't let them use it. Yeah, that was one sentence.


I don't know, if you know your old jazz/soul/motown/funk/whatever music you're going to stand a chance of picking out a sample whether its Nina Simone, Minnie Riperton, Fausto Papetti or Herbie Hancock. Its just best to be honest about these things unless you've completely changed the recording into what could be considered your own.


Sorry, back on topic. As for things you can use, just record little noises of your own and manipulate them with all the plug-ins in Pro-Tools. Fruity Loops is a logical place to start although I really don't like the way that programme works.
Quote by Mia (Pulp Fiction)
Why do we feel it's necessary to yak about bullsh*t in order to be comfortable?

That's when you know you found somebody special. When you can just shut the f*ck up for a minute, and comfortably share silence.

RateYourMusic
#9
Strange...I could've sworn I replied to this tread...but what I said was something like:

It's full studio so equipment isn't a factor. Reason has better samples then FL. They have like $10000 worth of software plugins alone(just got new invenstors ) We're doing a favor by getting all creative with this guy - so we're not gonna record our own samples without him paying more $$. My friend already made a simple beat: http://www.myspace.com/kryptstuff but I bashed him(calling it techno crap )

It's hard to get inspired to put out a really good rap beat because we're both metal-heads. So anything we should listen to? What's "hot" with hip-hop these days? General pointers about laying down a beat? thx again...tho you guys arguing probably killed this thread
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#10
Quote by KryptNet
Strange...I could've sworn I replied to this tread...but what I said was something like:

It's full studio so equipment isn't a factor. Reason has better samples then FL. They have like $10000 worth of software plugins alone(just got new invenstors ) We're doing a favor by getting all creative with this guy - so we're not gonna record our own samples without him paying more $$. My friend already made a simple beat: http://www.myspace.com/kryptstuff but I bashed him(calling it techno crap )

It's hard to get inspired to put out a really good rap beat because we're both metal-heads. So anything we should listen to? What's "hot" with hip-hop these days? General pointers about laying down a beat? thx again...tho you guys arguing probably killed this thread

Sample metal. I mean why not? Metal has good drums you can cut up with Recycle and make beats out of, there's often times very good atmsophere, and arpeggios are all over metal for some cool melodic content.

Keep in mind it takes a lot of listening and "training" to be able to hear a beat in a song. A year ago I would listen to a record and not be able to find anything. Now I could take that record and find a dozen samples in one track.

Don't look for entire melodic phrases, because they're hard to find. Try just cutting horn stabs (big band jazz is good for that), or a guitarist slowly opening up his wah pedal. Maybe take a nice field recorder out into a public place, record some atmosphere, put that in your sampler, and see if you can find cool "natural rhythms" in the sound of people talking, dogs barking, machines churning, or cars whooshing by (Kantye West did a good job of this on Common's tune The Corner, which is on youtube btw). Maybe record a light switching on or the door locking and use it as a sound effect. Keep your ears open and always be listening for weird things to sample.

Use your sampler as an instrument. Whether you're using an Akai or Battery (I use battery and I love it), there are always nice tools in there to help you tweak and alter sounds. And don't be afraid to get out your pedals and amps and run sounds through that.

Be creative!
#11
whats hot with hiphop nowadays may not necessarily be what works with the artist.

hip hop was born from sampling and is basically derivative of other music. you just need to find what kinda stuff the artist is comfortable deriving from. for example, is he slow and jazzy, or more upbeat, synthy and funky.

sorry its a bit of a copout answer, but as hiphop is pretty much made be guys sampling and cutting up any noise they can get their akais punching mitts on, it can sound any way you want it to, as long as it retains a few hiphop hallmarks (ie. 4/4 rhythm, kicks on the 1, 7 and 11, snares on the 5 and 13 etc)
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#12
Quote by FunkasPuck
(ie. 4/4 rhythm, kicks on the 1, 7 and 11, snares on the 5 and 13 etc)

Also you need is Kick on the first and third (which you can and should variate if you don't want to sound like dance music), and snare on the second and fourth.