#1
What is the best method for speed picking?

Let me explain, when I play I anchor my arm but keep my hand hovering over the strings, I play acoustic so I get a better sound directly over the hole, but if I try to speed pick in this position it seems very hard to do. If I rest my hand on the bridge it is alot easier, but it produces a twangier sound, which I do not like very much.

Now would I carry on speed picking at the bridge, or would alot of practice get me up to a fast level with an unrested hand. What is the best hand position basically...?
#2
rest your hand on the strings over the sound hole (as if you were palm muting it) and pick away
#3
speedpicking is a moot term. i could be picking quarter notes at 80 bpm and that would be the speed at which i'm picking. its all relative.

the best thing you can do is start slow and work your way up, all the while playing without tension. if you have to have some specific way of holding your hand or something then you're doing it wrong. sounds like you need to stop, re-evaluate your technique and start somewhere near the beginning of slow.

don't sweat it though, i had to do the same thing.

edit:

btw i make this statement because i play an acoustic, pretty damn quick i might add and i don't have to do anything special other than what i've already said which is

"start slowly and play without tension and learn good and proper technique"

i don't need to hold my hand any specific way on any specific guitar to get it picked right.
Last edited by z4twenny at Mar 25, 2008,
#4
^ So you don't rest your hand when you 'speedpick' then.

and basically, alot of practise would get me picking fast, without resting my hand....
#5
There's no such thing as "speedpicking" really, it's just picking....the better you are at it, as in the more control and accuracy you have, then the faster you can do it. It's the kind of thing that develops over years though, not weeks or months.

As far as anchoring goes general consensus is that having your hand "floating" does free you up, and having experimented I have to agree. However, I'm not yet worried about picking at insane speeds and don't think I ever will be, besides many guitarists who pick fast anchor.
Actually called Mark!

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#6
Quote by steven seagull
There's no such thing as "speedpicking" really, it's just picking....the better you are at it, as in the more control and accuracy you have, then the faster you can do it. It's the kind of thing that develops over years though, not weeks or months.

As far as anchoring goes general consensus is that having your hand "floating" does free you up, and having experimented I have to agree.


this is exactly what i was saying, perhaps our buddy steve said it better than me.
#7
Quote by z4twenny
this is exactly what i was saying, perhaps our buddy steve said it better than me.


In addition, he might have the best username on the entire forum.

/useless post
#8
Quote by z4twenny
this is exactly what i was saying, perhaps our buddy steve said it better than me.

Yeah, I was just re-iterating what you said when the TS brought the term up again
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#9
The best description I've heard for speed is "increased intensity of opposing
playing dynamics needing to be reconciled". If you can parse that, I think you
can get a better understanding of speed.

For example, alternate picking has the opposing dynamics of the up pick and
down pick. You could probably do either of those separately in the bat of an eye,
but they need to be reconciled as you go from 1 dynamic to another -- the up motion
needs to be converted to a down motion (and vice versa) with SKILL as the intensity
goes up. Intensity here is how much reconciling needs to be done in a given time.
#10
Hey Lum! I am not sure what you mean when you say "anchoring my arm", but I would be careful to anchor anything when playing. This can hold you back, but do keep in mind that technique can vary from player to player.

I agree that starting slow and working your way up is the best way to develop speed. Set goals for yourself and progressively raise your total playing speeds in a structured pattern over time. Try to make sure you are playing with as little tension as possible in your playing hand as well; it should be quite relaxed.


Chris
#11
^ cheers thats pretty much what i wanted to know.
I'm just happy I don't rest my hand anymor,...that is a big mistake!
#12
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In addition, he might have the best username on the entire forum.

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Funniest signature too. I was actually audibly laughing when I read it, and was smiling about it for several hours after.

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