#1
Are modes really useful for someone who plays mostly blues and progressive rock? If it is how do they really work? I have a confusion where if C ionian is the C major scale and C Aeolian is the minor scale, is the D ionian the D major scale or is D dorian the D major scale?? And if all the modes derived from the C Major scale which is just different starting points of the scale, how can you make each and every mode unique sounding?
#2
A) Theory sticky
B) You aren't ready for modes. You need to learn the theory behind the major scale and diatonic harmony before you worry about them.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
Quote by exotic
Are modes really useful for someone who plays mostly blues and progressive rock? If it is how do they really work? I have a confusion where if C ionian is the C major scale and C Aeolian is the minor scale, is the D ionian the D major scale or is D dorian the D major scale?? And if all the modes derived from the C Major scale which is just different starting points of the scale, how can you make each and every mode unique sounding?


Hello exotic. From my study so far, it seems that modes can be very useful in many different fields / genres of music. You just need to do some experimenting. You will want to check out Modal Theory as well.

As far as your confusions, it seems like you are simply confusing scales with modes. Modes are simply different ways (or sounds if you will) in which you can play these scales. In specific reference to what you have asked, I will say that D ionian is D major scale, because simply Ionian = major scale. If the dorian mode you were using started on D, then the Ionian (major) would start on C.

Since modes are different ways of moving through the same scales, this in and of itself makes the music / playing more creative. Making each and every mode unique sounding has to do with several things: your playing style, music you are playing, stuff like legato,bends,slides, and a ton of other things. Try and find / take some training on improving your improvising skills if you are looking to make your playing / style sound more unique.

Hope it helps!


Chris
#4
Quote by Chris Ferry
modes are different ways of moving through the same scales
Wrong-o...kind of. I won't argue that C Ionian and D Dorian contain the same notes, but they are used in completely different contexts.

Change your statement to "Modes are different ways of moving through the same notes," and I'll agree, though there is more to modal playing than just that.
#8
Quote by TheShred201
If your referring to the difference between Key and Mode, I would not use the term Major Scale, I would say that C aeolian is different from the Key of C minor.


Is this at me? My whole point was that key based music =/= modal music.. They're entirely different things.
#10
Quote by exotic
Are modes really useful for someone who plays mostly blues and progressive rock? If it is how do they really work? I have a confusion where if C ionian is the C major scale and C Aeolian is the minor scale, is the D ionian the D major scale or is D dorian the D major scale?? And if all the modes derived from the C Major scale which is just different starting points of the scale, how can you make each and every mode unique sounding?



Not mandatory but helps a lot and brings a nice flavor to your music.

and take any mode questions to a mode thread.
hue
#12
Fort most playing, blues, prog, jazz, metal, no, they really aren't.

But that's just my opinion.
#13
Quote by Nick_
Fort most playing, blues, prog, jazz, metal, no, they really aren't.

But that's just my opinion.


....Everything is useful in progressive music....
#14
That would depend on if by progressive you actually mean progressive, which, now that the word has become linked to style, has ironically been fixed to a meaning in a musical context.

For "progressive rock", I stand by my statement, not very useful.
#15
Quote by Nick_
That would depend on if by progressive you actually mean progressive, which, now that the word has become linked to style, has ironically been fixed to a meaning in a musical context.

For "progressive rock", I stand by my statement, not very useful.


Progressive rock tends to make heavy use of modes, actually.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#16
My knowledge of progressive rock is admittedly limited but from what I have studied I find that while the modal approach can be used to explain what they are doing there is usually a much simpler explanation and Occam's Razor applies.
#17
Quote by Nick_
My knowledge of progressive rock is admittedly limited but from what I have studied I find that while the modal approach can be used to explain what they are doing there is usually a much simpler explanation and Occam's Razor applies.


Occams razor is not applicable in this this situation.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#18
Quote by Nick_
My knowledge of progressive rock is admittedly limited but from what I have studied I find that while the modal approach can be used to explain what they are doing there is usually a much simpler explanation and Occam's Razor applies.


I agree with Archeo. And even if Occam's Razor were applicable, modes would be much simpler than most other methods.