#1
So... I play bass in my shcool's jazz band. I enjoy it alot. mainly because our director is so cool. But recently he has given us a homework assignment (which is very unusual because he never does this).

You see whenever our band goes to a festival, the judicator always asks who our favorite jazz musician is that plays our instrument. No one ever knows really, so our homework asignment is to make a list of 5 jazz artists (bass in my case), and find out what makes them so special or what they are famouse for.

I want to know what you guys think? Who are some really great jazz bassists?
#2
Charles Mingues
Jaco (just barely jazz though)
John Patitucci
Ron Carter
Stanley Clarke (YES, he has jazz)

I barely listen to jazz, and there are some people I got. Other people can help more.
#3
hey thanks... do you know where i could find alot of info on them? ... I mean i know i can always google it.
#5
Mingus is definately the top, and Jaco is definately a jazz bassist. It's just fusion, and rock-ish jazz, but still jazz.
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#6
I just checked out John Patitucci on you tube playing bach... it was sweet! Im checking Jaco... jazz fusion sounds interesting...
#7
Charles Mingus, and John Patitucci are the best in my opinion
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#12
Victor Wooten, Mingus, John Patitucci... Im deffinately adding those to the list... and thanx for the post mustangman311. thats pretty handy.
#13
Quote by ghost27
Victor Wooten, Mingus, John Patitucci... Im deffinately adding those to the list... and thanx for the post mustangman311. thats pretty handy.


Wait...your in jazz band, and you DON'T know Charles Mingus?

I will say that the wikipedia list isn't too good to go by, as it has a lot of people no one will EVER care about on it. You want the biggies right now.

But I don't know much jazz, but how is Wooten jazz?
#14
Wooten is wooten... im not sure he is jazz... but i don't know what the heck he is. Ill be honest, alot of jazz just sounds like a 3 year old that doesn know what the heck theyre doing. jazz isn my favorite music, but some of it can be pretty cool. the music were playing now is pretty cool, balads, swing, and samba stuff. its pretty cool music.
#16
Quote by IndianRockStar
But I don't know much jazz, but how is Wooten jazz?



He'd go under the fusion or perhaps smooth jazz heading. It's still jazz but not people's stereotypical view on what jazz should be.
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[22:08:26] <Confusius> you fuckers look cool


Want to know how to play bass in jazz? Read this.
#17
Run a youtube search of all these bassists, there will probably be something for all of them. I would recommend looking at some of Jaco's work with his big band he had for a while, something like this.
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#18
Quote by aguacateojos
Marcus Miller?


Yeah Miller is a jazz man, he is like Jaco though, it's more fusion than true jazz
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#19
Ray Brown is my favorite. The things that man can do with rhythm....

Another good one is Doug Watkins. You get extra points because he's glossed over a lot.
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#20
Three more people for you, Scott LaFaro, Larry Grenadier and Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen more normally called NHOP.
Founder of Jaco society

[22:08:23] <Confusius> I wish I was a bassist
[22:08:26] <Confusius> you fuckers look cool


Want to know how to play bass in jazz? Read this.
#21
Quote by The National D
Ray Brown is my favorite. The things that man can do with rhythm....

I thought that said Rex Brown for a minute
#23
Quote by ghost27
. Ill be honest, alot of jazz just sounds like a 3 year old that doesn know what the heck theyre doing.



You take that ignorant comment back and go listen to some of the Miles Davis Quintet!
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#24
Chris Wood, Scott LaFaro, Jaco, Marcus Miller, Charles Mingus
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#26
Quote by aguacateojos
James Jamerson.


Isn't he more of a funk guy?
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Quote by DisarmGoliath
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#27
+1 to sinan90 on Niels-Henning Orsted Pedersen/NHOP(can't do that damn O with the line through it, too lazy to look it up).

LOLDONNALEE
The first thirty seconds will probably be like "LOL WUT" as they're taking an already fast bop tune and playing it like...ridiculously fast as opposed to damn fast.
Last edited by grampastumpy at Mar 26, 2008,
#28
Jaco is great and all but I wouldn't really consider him a jazz guy. The lines he played owed more to funk than any jazz I've ever heard. But I guess that was all over jazz in the 70's so I could see the argument for that. Still, I think if you don't mention Paul Chambers and Ron Carter to someone asking you about jazz bassists they'll immediately think you don't have a clue. Mingus to a certain extent too, but I would say he's more acclaimed for his writing and composition than actual bass (not that he was bad by any stretch of the imagination).
#29
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Jaco is great and all but I wouldn't really consider him a jazz guy. The lines he played owed more to funk than any jazz I've ever heard. But I guess that was all over jazz in the 70's so I could see the argument for that.



Jaco is most definitely jazz, the only thing is that what he plays is not typically the role of a bass in general in pretty much any form of music, it was really him that made it an instrument that had a role in the frontline of a band where he'd be the sole melodic interest in a tune.

So if you want to know how to play the standard jazz role first, Jaco is not a great example, but for a different role in the music then he's great.
Founder of Jaco society

[22:08:23] <Confusius> I wish I was a bassist
[22:08:26] <Confusius> you fuckers look cool


Want to know how to play bass in jazz? Read this.
#31
Quote by grampastumpy
+1 to sinan90 on Niels-Henning Orsted Pedersen/NHOP(can't do that damn O with the line through it, too lazy to look it up).

LOLDONNALEE
The first thirty seconds will probably be like "LOL WUT" as they're taking an already fast bop tune and playing it like...ridiculously fast as opposed to damn fast.

Wow... I like how they're just like

"O hay guise"

*SHREDDING*

*Crowd politely applauses*
#32
Marcus Miller plays Jazz, he says so himself!

He's AMAZING!
"The can is a good place to keep the Funk...it stays Funky"
#33
Quote by 83lespaulstudio
Stanley Clarke is my Jazz/Fusion hero. here is a sample.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MmI_BsVfuCg
also check his site.
http://www.stanleyclarke.com


The man has some serious traditional jazz chops as well. I've seen him play live and he is a genius in both fusion and traditional jazz. Just listen to his CD "Standards" and you'll get a feel for his talent in that area.

And I will second whoever mentioned Charlie Haden. Ornette Coleman is not everyone's cuppa, but Charlie's bass work with Coleman really pushed the boundaries, and I need to get some more recordings of his work with LMO.