#1
Im confused about which chords go good together when writing the rhythm part. What kind of theory do you need to learn to know which chords sound good together?
Last edited by exotic at Mar 26, 2008,
#2
Theory sticky.
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#4
uhh can you actually tell what PART of theory to learn because thats what i asked, not to explain to me the whole theory lesson.-.-
#5
you need to know what chords are in whay KEY. theres a start.
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#7
Quote by exotic
uhh can you actually tell what PART of theory to learn because thats what i asked, not to explain to me the whole theory lesson.-.-


Theory sticky.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by exotic
Im confused about which chords go good together when writing the rhythm part. What kind of theory do you need to learn to know which chords sound good together?


To learn which chords go together based on theory:

thats a big question. People learn that in a semester or 2 of theory classes.... not in one thread on the internet.

The theory sticky might give you some ideas though. its a good place to start.

to learn which chords sound good together:

use your ears and decide for yourself. Play a few chords. If they sound good together..... they sound good together.

learning songs is a good way to get an idea of what chords sound good together as well. I would highly recommend doing that.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 26, 2008,
#9
Quote by GuitarMunky
To learn which chords go together based on theory:

thats a big question. People learn that in a semester or 2 of theory classes.... not in one thread on the internet.

The theory sticky might give you some ideas though. its a good place to start.

to learn which chords sound good together:

use your ears and decide for yourself. Play a few chords. If they sound good together..... they sound together.


Seriously?

... Oh...
#10
Is Chord Progression Theory supposed to help any on this? Becuase I read some of that stuff on the stick and it doesnt help much.
#11
It should give you some insight as to what should sound good together.
#12
Quote by exotic
Is Chord Progression Theory supposed to help any on this? Becuase I read some of that stuff on the stick and it doesnt help much.


You want to learn about chord progressions and you're unsure whether this helps? What problem are you having with it?
#13
The problem im having is that im not sure which theory im supposed to learn to find out which chords sound good together.
#14
Quote by exotic
The problem im having is that im not sure which theory im supposed to learn to find out which chords sound good together.


A good couple of places to start would be to learn about the major scale and different keys. You'll be able to get a good base of knowledge in chord construction and progressions from learning about these.
#15
Hey exotic. Here is what I know of the subject.

You would need to learn your major scales or at least how to formulate them. With this in hand, you will now know what notes you have each scale or key, which will then soon allow you to know chords you may implement into the chord progression for that key.

You will need to have knowledge of how to build triads in order to take the notes from those major scales and build chords from them (IE: major triad 1 - 3 - 5 of each notes own major scale from the key).

Also you will want to study / learn Key Chord Formulas for knowledge of which chords in each key are major, minor, diminished, etc. For example, the Major Key Chord Formula is as follows: I ii iii IV V vi viio -- upper case roman numbers being major, lower case roman numbers being minor, and the 7th degree here being diminished.

You will want to go over and study things like this in music theory over and over again until you sink in well. Once you get more of this, then it just becomes a matter of piecing different chords together in proper progression format until you find ones that you enjoy. There are also some good books offered on popular chord progressions that mix well.

I'm sure it gets far more complex and I'm by far not the best teacher (hope some of my explanation at least helped your or pointed you in the right direction).

In any case, hope that this helps you some. Cheers man!


Chris
#17
Quote by exotic
Is Chord Progression Theory supposed to help any on this? Becuase I read some of that stuff on the stick and it doesnt help much.


"Is Chord Progression Theory supposed...blah blah blah?"

ARE you kidding me?
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#18
You need to learn about chord construction, then how to make chord progressions based on a particular scale.
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#20
Quote by exotic
Thanks for the help guys
wow exotic, all that abuse and still a thank you post. You're a good sport man! If anything in the theory sticky or anything mentioned here is confusing you, just ask!
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